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Niko
06-23-2008, 11:19 AM
I just got a call from my lawyer's office. My upcoming disability hearing will be next month.

The call -- I need to get an independent psych. evaluation to add to the paperwork for the judge.

The question:

What is involved with a psych. eval. concerning MS???

-- factors
* I'm R/R dx'd 7/2000
* I have severe fatigue
* I have a small child
* I don't drive very far (fatigue related)

If any of you have gone through a psych. eval. for SS disability applications, please let me know.

Thanks!!!

Niko




GladysD
06-23-2008, 01:55 PM
I didn't have a complete eval(at least not like the questionaires a regular one would have you fill out)....I went to one of their appoved counselors. He sat me down, asked me some questions, took some notes and sent me on my way.

Sorry it's not much help, but it wasn't that involved in my case.

I didn't get disability anyhow....

Niko
06-23-2008, 02:51 PM
I didn't have a complete eval(at least not like the questionaires a regular one would have you fill out)....I went to one of their appoved counselors. He sat me down, asked me some questions, took some notes and sent me on my way.

Sorry it's not much help, but it wasn't that involved in my case.

I didn't get disability anyhow....

Gladys,

Thanks for the reply! I'm not sure what to expect. It sounded like paperwork and an interview.

Niko

Riverwild
06-23-2008, 03:48 PM
Do they want you to have a psych eval or a neuropsych eval?

I've done a neuropsych eval for a baseline. It wasn't fun, especially when I saw the report...:mad:...but I don't think the two are the same. The neuropsych eval was long and involved, they did a full workup of cognitive skills, problem solving, memory skills, IQ, etc. I believe it was about 6 hours long (it was a long time ago) I remember it took me most of the day to do!

Let us know how it turns out! :hug:

Niko
06-23-2008, 04:46 PM
Do they want you to have a psych eval or a neuropsych eval?

I've done a neuropsych eval for a baseline. It wasn't fun, especially when I saw the report...:mad:...but I don't think the two are the same. The neuropsych eval was long and involved, they did a full workup of cognitive skills, problem solving, memory skills, IQ, etc. I believe it was about 6 hours long (it was a long time ago) I remember it took me most of the day to do!

Let us know how it turns out! :hug:

That's a very good question but I don't know the answer. I'll keep you guys posted!

Niko

DejaVu
06-23-2008, 06:40 PM
a neuropsych evaluation. They will most likley be looking at be looking at the things Riverwild has mentioned!:hug:

Some do neuropsych evals in a shorter version, while others do lengthy ones.

These do look at memory, problem-solving/reasoning skills, sometimes a little bit of math, ability to comprehend, etc.

If you are applying (or renewing) based upon your own doctor's opinion, as in your neurologist's opinion/records, this interview also gives the evlauator an opportunity to ask questions/to interview you.

I had found a psychologist doing a neuropsych test had asked lots of questions not really pertinent to "neuropsych" per se. The claims person assigned to my case had asked him to ask these questions as the claims person had wanted more information than I was willing to divulge. I am not suggesting anyone withhold information. I'd just happened to have a really bad (inexperienced and very pompous) claims evaluator (renewal/review) and he really went way over the boundaries with questions.

(The claims investigator was poorly behaved enough to issue written threats to me regarding I would sign 10 blank releases for him... or else he'd immediately suspend my claim, and a few other nonsensical threats, denying me my rights. Fortunately, his threats were in writing and were of great interest to my U.S. Senators and then to the head honcho of the SSA!)

When the psychologist started treading in areas that were questionable, I gently let him know that I knew he probably should not be appoaching some of those topics, as they were in no way pertinent to the neuropsych eval. The psychologist stopped when I'd asked him why he was asking certan questions and how those specific questions were pertinent to the neuropsych eval?

(I knew the claims person was behind these questions, as any psychologist would know, themselves, which questions are appropriate and necessary and which ones were not.)

Allow me to mention that I don't think this happens a lot...however, I am not sure.

If you ever have questions about personal questions you are being asked, you may gently inquire as to why they are pertinent/necessary. However, always appear cooperative while asking, so they do not simply label you as uncooperative.

I do not know of anyone leaving a neuropsych exam feeling "great!"
I think it might help you to realize this beforehand? It is "normal" to leave neuropsych testing feeling a bit "unsettled."

Many times, if illness is severe enough to apply for disability, it does have an impact, at least intermittently upon cognition. Many illnesses have a systemic effect. Also, it is normal for people to feel nervous. :hug:

Also, many will not release a copy of the eval. report to the applicant. So... if you'd like to see a copy, be prepared to provide the name and address of a doctor you would like to have receive a copy of the report, as they will release the report to a doctor of your choosing.:hug:

It's probably never as bad as we think it might be!:grouphug:

I hope yours is a breeze!:hug:

Niko
06-24-2008, 07:07 AM
a neuropsych evaluation. They will most likley be looking at be looking at the things Riverwild has mentioned!:hug:

Some do neuropsych evals in a shorter version, while others do lengthy ones.

These do look at memory, problem-solving/reasoning skills, sometimes a little bit of math, ability to comprehend, etc. ...

It's probably never as bad as we think it might be!:grouphug:

I hope yours is a breeze!:hug:


The more I think of it (trying not to) my stress level rises. So, I just remind myself of this:

I am who I am, who I was is in the past, and the future me I haven't met.

And...

I'm a lefty :) I read a statistic :shrug: that about 10% of the world's population are left-handed. I'm glad to be a member of that group!:D


DejaVu, thanks for the response!


Niko

doydie
06-25-2008, 12:28 AM
We have one neuro pshychiatrist in the area so he gets all the referalls for SSD. Here SSD just has the mini psych eval. But about a year before my SSD required one my neuro had requested one and my insurance wouldn't pay for it so I didn't have it done. So I told this to the guy doing the testing. Oh, did he get upset. He said that to some one with MS and having cognitive proablems a complete neuro psych test was important so he did it for free! Of course what he turned in to the SSD was the mini one but I had him give a report to my lawyer who submitted it to the court when I had my hearing.

Anyway this neuro psychiatrist said that just with the testing alone he could pinpoint areas in the brain that had problems but just werent big enough to show up on MRI yet.

The report is very intersting. It finally validates to family etc that the symptoms you are having are real. It gives actual scientific evidence of what the problem is. It also let me know that some of the problems I had said were do to stress, age etc were actually MS.

the testing was rigorous but going back to get the results with the doctor was very interesting. One thing I got from talking to him was that with MS, you don't lose any of your memories, words or anything. It's just that because of things like stress, only a certain amount of things can come out of your brain. And stress can be anything, heat, arguements, hectic schedule, illness or anything.

Niko
06-25-2008, 04:45 AM
Doydie,

That is interesting. I was dx'd back 2000 while the symptoms began a year earlier. I was under heavy, long-term stress, due to my work environment.

The test will be interesting.

Niko