PDA

View Full Version : Have You Ever been Shorted meds at a Pharmacy?




Junie
12-19-2006, 11:15 PM
Last Month for the first time ever I looked up my meds and each night took out exactly the amount needed for the next day and I new my med count was right.....well towards the end of the month I saw I was gonna be short 3 Kadian..my Valium and percocet were right on the money so since I have used CVS for year and never complained.......I thought (I could go in and talk to pharmacist and explain situation and the laughed in my faced and said they Never make mistakes....always had a double count....so I told them they just lost a **** of a customer and was switching to Walgreen s, and she just laughed again....rude as can be!
Well yesterday it was time to fill my percocet and I was on auto pilot and dropped it off at cvs before thinking...(had a very bad weekend, fall, babysitting two girls 8-9 so I was fried) and I picked them up went home and promply counted them (supposed to be 75) and guess how many was in the never make mistakes cvs??? 78 was how many!!!! How do you recommend I do with this info?? What do you think we can do?? Count with them???
Thanks in advance!!




Curious
12-19-2006, 11:24 PM
that is really sad they treated you that way. not right at all. :mad:

we had a problem with dad's pd meds a few times. ( not at cvs ) the pharmacist was awesome. he admitted that they are human and that errors can and do happen. but he did say that on some meds his hands are tied if an error is made the customer has left with the rx. ( pain meds especially)

i would hate to think that you have to stand there and count the pills, but maybe if it was done once, they would wise up.

funny how they gave you 3 extra...when they shorted you that many before. woner if they were worried about an audit. ;)

Junie
12-19-2006, 11:34 PM
Yeah but they shorted me 3 long acting 100mg morhine and gave me 3 10mg percocet!!!:mad:

Curious
12-19-2006, 11:41 PM
dang junie. i didn't catch that part. what about contacitn their head courters or the store manager? they might be having a problem with not just your rx's.

Idealist
12-19-2006, 11:50 PM
I think you should complain, if for no other reason than that it might make a difference for someone else down the line.

I was shorted once on one of my meds, but since I didn't catch the mistake until a few days later, I never bothered to complain. I just took less than I was supposed to for a few days to make up the difference. Ever since then I've felt bad that I never said anything to the pharmacist about it.

It's so easy to get yourself labeled when you complain about your narcotics, even when you're in the right. One time my doc accidentally prescribed me a twenty-five day supply intead of the usual thirty. He wrote out a hundred, and I was taking them four times a day. When I showed up back at the office twenty-five days later, I was given a lecture on narcotic addiction, along with a hefty amount of paperwork. It took a lot of work to get that corrected in my file.

Junie
12-20-2006, 12:08 AM
I have decided to take my new script and old one and raise hell since I was the one that suffered taking one Kadian a day rather then two and maybe get that rude witch in trouble if possible!

mrsD
12-20-2006, 08:01 AM
shorted. And they can be over as well.

For meds other than CII (like Kadian) many larger chains use a counting
machine. These are totally inaccurate over time. I have had many battles
with these machines. So if you hear and see one in your pharmacy, you
should count ALL of your meds on a routine basis. These machines most often OVERcount however, than under. It has to do with the calibration screws coming loose and letting more pills thru past the laser, rather than the reverse of shorting. (This of course leads to loss of revenue for the pharmacy).

For controls including CII almost every pharmacy now has double count rules, in place. The volume of RXs keeps going up everywhere, and haste is usually
the cause of a miscount.

For CII's especially pharmacies keep a daily LOG (called a perpetual inventory) and fill in the blanks for every
RX (some Mom and Pop ones do not). These logs are typically tallied at the
end of every month(some at the end of the week) However, I have seen some stores, those with especially high volumes of opiates keep a running count right on the BOTTLE. That is as the RX is filled, the bottle remaining itself is counted, to see if the tallies match. This is the best way, but also the most time consuming.

Employees can be dishonest. Techs come and go, and new help is untested for several months. One really does not know who the employee really is when first hired.
For this reason, you should bring up your short count with the pharmacist.
Many stores require tech initials right on the bottle now, for this reason.
Scarfing a few from each RX is a type of pilfering, and needs to be caught, if it is intentional.

Drugs like Kadian are not fast movers, like Vicodin. Errors with it can be caught quickly, and should show up on the daily log. High volume items are
harder to track, and much more easily diverted by employees.

It is always possible to request a count right at the counseling window.
Expect to be watched closely however, because customers as well as employees have ways of scamming when CII's are involved. This is not a reflection on you per se, but the climate today in our culture.

People are human, they get interrupted while working and can lose concentration, and they can be dishonest. So there are many factors.
If your pharmacy keeps a LOG carefully, and you bring this matter up, and they find an overage they will most likely give you what you are shorted.
However, I have seen "shorts" involving controls, not corrected for customers.
It all depends on the pharmacist, policy of chains, and the situation. If you get an OVERAGE, you cannot return them, as drugs are
not returnable. But I would let them know, so if their log is off they won't blame innocent employees. If you are OVER you can
offer to be shorted 3 next time when you get your next fill. (this will bring the log back to normal), but you don't have to offer that, and they most likely will not suggest it. (It will be considered an "error" not a internal theft).

Non controlled items are often given without questions. But because of strict inventory requirements CIIs are handled somewhat differently. Some chains even have security people come in weekly to check the logs and count the contents of the remaining bottles, now.
Oxycontin is the usual target, but I have seen Adderall get spot checked as well.

One of the biggest diversions I have ever seen occurred at a Mom and Pop, by a male tech,BTW. For now, insist on counting at the counter, before you leave. Your file will probably be flagged and a triple count will be done on your order. And the staff will be alerted to a possibly dishonest employee.

Junie
12-20-2006, 11:52 AM
Hi,
I was highly insulted the way she implied there was no way they could make a mistake and that there must be funny business going on at my house!!! In over 5 years I have never complained even when I suspected but this time I knew the added precautions I took so felt justified in bringing this to their attention! I guess I just want my name cleared somehow and want this rude woman punished!

mrsD
12-20-2006, 03:14 PM
I find many types like you describe now in pharmacy. This is due to many factors. The excessive theoretical bias in schools now, select against those with helpful personalities. Only the "nerds" can handle the school work anymore.

The same is happening with doctors.

Also, there is a huge upward trend in Rx volume per day. It is reaching
epidemic stress levels. People cannot handle problems every 30 seconds or so...they burn out...even if they had good intentions to begin with.
I just got an Email from Medscape on this problem.

Think of yourself faced with 300+ problems daily... all different. Few can remain
helpful anymore. There is just not time.

If you are insulted.. complain to management--via the main # provided by the store you visit. Often they will give you a gift certificate to use for other merchanize. But don't expect any changes...there is a shortage of pharmacists now due to poor working conditions. At least you can move on and use the $20 as a bandaid.

I am not making excuses, but that is just the way it is today. I left retail, because of it.

Junie
12-20-2006, 03:26 PM
I can and have taken insults and just walked away and being a nurse for 15 years and a waitress for 15 years I know how to deal with people....but that 3 pill shortage put me in hell for three days since I decided to just take 1 a day for the last days and I was in complete misery and when working with sick people there is never a good excuse for rudeness....and I am lucky enough to have been on both sides!:)

mrsD
12-20-2006, 03:36 PM
http://www.drugtopics.com/drugtopics/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=389603

margosmilesforu
02-18-2008, 03:28 PM
I have been taking perocet 10 for 3 years now and am on 84 every 3 weeks well i went up to my local walgreens which i never gotten my pain meds filled at that one before but i have filled my other meds there and never had a problem, i really have not ever had a problem filling my meds where i usually get them filled well i went there picked them up came home open up the stabled bag and open the bottle to get my daily meds fixed on (YOU KNOW THEM BOXES BY THE WEEK) any way the bottle seemed that there was not 84 in them so i counted and counted and guess what i counted again and i only counted 60 yeah i got shorted 24 that to me is a week of freaking alot of pain,,,i called up to the pharmacy knowing that i felt damn if i do damn if i don't cause you know how people get treating anyway,,cause no one knows what kind of hell is my pain,,she only took 30 seconds came back on phone and said well our inventory is right, well something is wrong cause now i am short 24 and someone there either has them or something is wrong. She said i can not do anything about it,oh my god i felt like a total crazed woman you feel likeif you make a big deal then you look like a seeker but i am not a seeker i am a comsumer in pain and now very upset. How do you even win this battle yes i know never go there again but there is still the fact that someone there either pocketed them or yes inverntory wrong, i called to talk to the manager like my husband said to he said you are in the right and i know i am but you all know how it feels really..they said there was no manager on duty, what do i do now,,,REALLY WHAT DO YOU THINK I SHOULD DO, you can not fight the pharmacy THEY ARE RIGHT,,,so any suggestions?

Vowel Lady
03-07-2008, 11:33 PM
I was going to the same pharmacy for many years at a chain store, even though the pharmacist there was never helpful and always grouchy. He would yell at co-workers, etc. I would NEVER ask this guy a question even if my life depended on it. I was always grateful when it was his day off and the "substitute" pharmacist was on. She was very helpful.

However, one day I got into a huge argument with the guy that worked there regularly (the grouchy one). I was asking for a medication that was formerly prescription only, but now OTC. He pitched a fit and in his own way, called me "stupid." I was very kind and tried to correct him, but he pitched a little fit again. Ironically, he was the one in error.

I called for the manager and ask to speak with him privately. While we were in the back office, lo and behold the pharmacist discovered I was right and he was wrong.

After that, I went to another location of the same chain. They were much nicer...more helpful. However, recently they have had to order some of my meds because they don't have the right strength on hand...they said they would do it...and they didn't do it. (Long story...bottom line...they are unorganized and goofy).

I've had more weird problems with this chain...so very recently I have picked up my meds at a mom and pop drug store. The hours aren't nearly as good, but other things are excellent. Very helpful, kind, fast service.

CayoKay
03-08-2008, 12:49 AM
shorted, yes.

and extras as well.

usually not a problem, and fixed by the pharmacy, with little trouble.

the only *BAD* thing with my meds was that twice I was given someone ELSE's Rx.

a woman with the exact same name, and the same medicine.

but in a different dosage...

the only reason I noticed, is the pills were a bit larger.

so, I checked the receipt, and sure enough, I'd moved to the other side of town!

(Long's receipts at that time printed out name and address.)

I didn't even realize there was someone else with my name, in such a small town (3,000 people)

I raised Cain over it, and they groveled appropriately, and swore it'd never happen again.

four months later, guess what? so I took my business elsewhere.

southie
03-08-2008, 01:00 AM
You can REQUEST a DOUBLE COUNT
at your local Pharmacy Chain - like
Walgreens, CVS, etc.

Where they have to sign for it (that is
on the bottle) and the Pharmacist has
to put their initials on it.

I had been shorted out before; and
since one of my medication is a
narcotic - that one was being shorted
(the others weren't); but since going
to CVS; they're WONDERFUL! While
I do have a main Pharmacist, he
prefers to handle all my prescriptions
himself. They've done a lot for me and
are very protective of me, in fact, TWICE
they were about to have their employee
to take me down to the Primary Doctor's
office, and the other time to the ER after
calling the Epi's office, and was about to
give me Ativan, but I snapped out of it.

However, my Primary wanted me in his
office anyway (just around the corner),
and I lapsed right back into seizure mode,
and he was about to summon the ambulance
and how I managed to flee and end up home
is over my head. I have no recollection of this
until he called me back to which my son answered
the phone and he was surprised, because I was
in bed, sound asleep and he never knew I ever
left the house! But he left a note for me to see
my Primary (again), and that's how I know what
had happened the 1st time.

The 2nd time - I learned about it from the Epi's
Office; where the Nurse called me the next day,
for the Epi was out of town - and I was confused
as heck, and on top of it even CVS, the Pharmacist
even called to see how I was doing ... I'm like ...

:confused:

::: whoosh ::::

Over my head. I had no memory of it. But when I
saw him (Pharmacist) again, he told me what had
happened. They were very close to having me on
Ativan and sent to the ER.

I appreciate those folks dearly; but now being on
the right cocktails (slang for AEDs - anti-epileptic
drugs) - everything has been peachy; but they
still watch me like a hawk.

They are very much in tune with my Doctors
and vice versa. They are part of the "team".
They know my name, and can pull my info up
in a flash. I don't know when the last time I've
had to tell someone my name to pick up my
prescription over there!

:o

dahlek
03-09-2008, 10:15 AM
I would e-mail the company headquarters and indicate that this has happened frequently. That way the main office can put a 'watch' on the staffs. This sounds like a horrible thing to even think of, but with many costly or restricted medications this is important to do. It can protect you, and also the pharmacy overall from drug abuse [either using or selling the shorted meds] by the pharmacist or a whole slew of possible other issues, such as incorrect prescriptions.
I say this only because I knew of a pharmacist who became addicted and, needless to say it affected their work, not to mention a loss of license.
It's sad that we have to be 'tattle tales' at times, but one mistake...well OK, more than one seems to be signs of a problem. One at your expense!
I must caution tho? Some pharmacies have 'restrictions' in terms of how many 'days' they can dispense a med for [30, 60, 90 days] depending on the med, how the prescription is written and how the insurance company restricts this stuff. It IS one big hassle. Be patient and find out those limits and what you can do. Good luck?
Hope this helps! - j

dllfo
03-15-2008, 04:55 PM
Pharmacies are like the people working there.

Walgreens shorted me twenty Avinza. I had a "factory sealed" bottle of 100, but could not find the other twenty. I told the Pharmacist and they said there is nothing they can do.

In California, I am told, if you go get your Class II meds and are shorted, you cannot go back to get the rest. They legally cannot dispense them without a prescription and according to their records, my prescription had been filled. They told me they double count them, so an error by them is highly unlikely. I told their pharmacist about it and left the task to him, expecting some form of explanation. When I did not hear anything I called him and found the evening I spoke to him was his last day with Walgreens. Hmmm. He had quit to work closer to his home.

I called the regional manager of their stores and the regional mgr of their pharmacies. They thanked me and said they would investigate. I am reducing my use of Avinza, so I had some left over. If I had not, I would have been in trouble.

They said their log showed they gave me 100 in one bottle and twenty in another. I told them that was NOT correct. I also keep a log and I can tell them every dosage I had taken, the hour and minute and date and dosage. For over 500 days I kept that log, so we can compare logs. Walgreens only gave me more than one container of Avinza once. I went on a 3 month vacation. Otherwise, they combine the quantity into one container.

I told them if it happened again, I would go to the DEA and then read the phone number of the DEA agency in our city. I wanted to make sure they knew I meant it.

NOW I look for the pharmacist's initials and "count" number on each bottle. I take Oxycodone as well. It would not bother me at all to ask for a count while I watched.

I think the part that disturbs me the most is them telling me if we leave the pharmacy with our meds, that prescription is considered completed. The customer is out of luck. If it happens to me again, I will complain to DEA and the State Agencies who monitor pharmacies. I would think Corporate would take DEA complaints seriously.

soxmom
03-15-2008, 05:49 PM
Yes, Ive had the wrong number of pills many times. its best to count
them right there because if its pain meds, you are out of luck. I
also was once given trazadone instead of tramadol.:eek: Boy, I took
two of those and I was down for the count. Of course, i HAD to be
out of state at my mil:rolleyes:.

Good luck, you should not have been treated that way.

Sox

Kitty
03-16-2008, 04:54 AM
Yes, Ive had the wrong number of pills many times. its best to count
them right there because if its pain meds, you are out of luck. I
also was once given trazadone instead of tramadol.:eek: Boy, I took
two of those and I was down for the count. Of course, i HAD to be
out of state at my mil:rolleyes:.

Good luck, you should not have been treated that way.

Sox

I agree. I know it's a hassle and if you have alot of prescriptions it can take a while but once they know you're checking they might get "better" at math and give you the correct number of pills the first time.

It's just like going to the bank...if I cash a check for $90 and they give it to me in $1's you'd better believe I'm counting it before moving from the teller's window or driving away from the drive-thru.

If anyone gets offended too bad - you're just protecting yourself. Who else is going to?

Tarl
05-25-2008, 01:03 PM
I am surprised that there are not more complaints. My son takes Allegra (fexofenadine HCL) and has 30 day prescriptions for twice a day. The prescription is clearly labeled for Quantity of 60. I thought the first time this happened that instead of looking at Quantity, the pharmacist must have looked at dosage and overlooked "twice a day".

When I drove to pick-up my son's prescription, the pharmacist reponded
with a now familiar, and inflamatory phrase, "refill too early"! I have become accustomed to difference in depth of 30 and 60 pills in prescription bottles
of similar circumference so that i do not have to double count, but did not realize this until getting home last time. I was infuriated when pharmacist explained my two options:
1) wait 2 days to have prescription filled
2) pay full price (a difference of only $20), wait for Pharmacy manager
to come in (also on Tuesday) to count remaining pills in pharmacy
to determine a shortage and my $20 would be refunded at that time.

My son has asthma, and this is middle of allergy season for him
(he is allergic to tree pollen). I also had no reason to believe that
pharmacy manager would count pills and rule in my favor.
This is second time this has happened in a year.

I do not know what controls are in-place, and what i could do to keep
from happening again. I suppose i could always request a double count,
but pharmacist refered to light-gun. Can they not go back and determine precisely how many pills they counted for last prescription
(whether 30 or 60)?

What controls are in place to prevent pharmacists from counting 30
and charging patients or insurance company for 60?

I find myself in position of proving my innocence and understand that i could
have dropped the pills, sold them, or could even be hoarding them.

Is there any other recourse, but for me to always request recount,
which 80% of time will make me appear to be just being difficult?

Insurance company has allowed us to request "Medical-Loss Override",
and may now be suspicious that shortages could be deliberate. They may
investigate. I just wish that existing controls would prevent from ever happening. It seems that great expense and effort is wasted on controls
that are currently ineffective ;-/

But thank you for providing this forum. Understanding goes a long way
to relieving frustration. I have already added to favorites ;-)
:grouphug:

mrsD
05-25-2008, 07:50 PM
If your label says 60 and there are 30 inside.... there are two reasons...

1) a mistake
2) they were out of stock and should give you an owe slip.

If the RX said 60 and you got 30 and 30 is typed on the label, then
there is an insurance problem.

Some insurances only allow so many days of Allegra per year (mine does this)
Once you go over that allotment, you have to pay for the balance.

If your pharmacy is constantly shorting you --- report them to the
board of pharmacy in your state. And/or call Corporate directly.

Tarl
05-25-2008, 08:18 PM
I see automated dispensors. Are all medications dispensed first by automated dispensor - in which case they would have a record of number requested,
30 compare with quantity on bottle 60, and immediately reconcile?

They perahaps should then have to manually count to ensure automated dispensor did not give too many - problem solved.

Unfortunately, Walgreens pharmacist is defensive, and i have been forced
to go somewhere else now that is not open 24 hours a day, but has much lower pharmacist turn-over. They have never shorted me (Costco).

Two shortages in one year = $60 overcharge to insurance, and $40 overcharge to me. I can not overlook possibilty that this is intentional.
There appear to be no controls in place to prevent :mad:

Kitty
05-26-2008, 06:12 AM
I see automated dispensors. Are all medications dispensed first by automated dispensor - in which case they would have a record of number requested,
30 compare with quantity on bottle 60, and immediately reconcile?

They perahaps should then have to manually count to ensure automated dispensor did not give too many - problem solved.

Unfortunately, Walgreens pharmacist is defensive, and i have been forced
to go somewhere else now that is not open 24 hours a day, but has much lower pharmacist turn-over. They have never shorted me (Costco).

Two shortages in one year = $60 overcharge to insurance, and $40 overcharge to me. I can not overlook possibilty that this is intentional.
There appear to be no controls in place to prevent :mad:


Hi Tarl,

I see that you're a new member.....welcome to NeuroTalk! I copied your first post over to our New Members Forum so you could be properly welcomed. Glad you found the site!!

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk302/herekitty1960/Welcome%20Cats/welcomecatfacewelcome.jpg

mrsD
05-26-2008, 06:22 AM
The large machines like RiteAid uses....called ScripPro
Those have a laser sensor and when the calibration key loosens with vibration,
those tend to OVERCOUNT Rxs. Hence the pharmacy loses money. The pills will fall thru the opening in twos or threes and be counted as one by the laser. (and I may add that people rarely call back to say they got over the stated amount. Perhaps only 10% in my experience notify the pharmacy of an overage)

Tabletop counters also may overcount, since they use light also.
However the Baker units may undercount. (they do not use lasers, and are pretty old fashioned and I haven't seen them recently in stores for this reason.
They make alot of drug dust and cause OSHA issues.

I have never seen a modern machine robot counter UNDERcount.

There are dishonet people in this world...however, pharmacists are less common.
The techs however, are often dishonest.
If and this is a big IF something dishonest is going on there, and stealing is bigtime, then they would be doing something to conceal it. Stealing from customers is dangerous and rather stupid to hide their own stealing. Because obviously customers notice and draw attention to the behavior. But it is possible.

You have to realize that the percentage of customers that lie to get what they want in pharmacies is very high. So over time pharmacists can get rather jaded. There is no excuse for "defensiveness" on the part of pharmacists however. Defensiveness suggests concealing of "something".

If you have that little vial that obviously cannot hold 60 tablets as appears on your label, I'd suggest you hold on to it, and call corporate headquarters and complain. Take a photo of it. On the bottle bottom is the size in drams printed on it. A 13 dr vial is obviously not going to hold 60 Allegra 180s.
Now, if it is only Allegra they are shorting you.... you need to call your insurance company and find out if Allegra benefits are limited. But if you are being shorted on other than Allegra, then you need to document and make a fuss. I sure would. We have a very liberal insurance and this limitation on Allegra caught me on vacation of all times. So I know it exists for others.
If you were limited this way, your label would read 30, not 60.

If something really bad is going on in that pharmacy, and corporate suspects it but cannot prove it yet, your complaint may be very crucial to getting it action there. So I really suggest you do that.

DO NOT complain further at the store local level. The manager may be part of any organized theft ring...and therefore
your complaint would be buried. (I have seen that happen! Trust me)

gamgam
05-28-2008, 08:02 AM
I suppose its always possible for anything to make mistakes, us or machines. However, CVS is all over the new in Atlanta area for making mistakes with giving out the wrong medicine and its not once in awhile. So, I would bring it to their attention, no matter what pharmacy it is that you use, so it can be corrected.

I use a local family owned pharmacy and any time they may not have enough of something to fill my script, they always let me know how many they owe me and when they will have it available. Also, if a pill changes form, they always call that to my attention so I will know that what I got was right but that it may have a different shape or color. This usually happens with generics.

DataEntryAssistants
03-02-2009, 09:43 PM
ROXICODONE & OXYCODONE are unavailable in South Florida. They are non-existent for about a week now and this goes in cycles. I'd like to call the regulators the "DataEntryAssistants". Since myself and others in pain are just a statistic and deprived of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. They could care less of persons with long-term pain, pain that can't be fixed by surgery, Grandma's & Grandpa's that served our country and now suffering tremendously in their "Golden Years".

This is ridiculous. I am permanently disabled without the medication. I can't get out of bed, much less work.

These "controlled shortages" are becoming all to common. Patients have rights. When I can't get medication I can't work which trickles through my family. I lose my job, less food on the table, collect unemployment, fighting with my wife and irritated with everything, and I lose the little bit of joy I have left in my life.

The questions I will ask the DEA will be" What did I do for your agency to cut my medication off"? "Why is my family and I suffering, because you have have minded controls in place?". "What did my grandma of 92 who passed in May of 2008 do to hurt someone while in her death bed for many years".

I will bring this to the attention of Congress. There are thousands of people abusing, selling, stealing. But, do the millions of people in pain, be tortured because of the bad apples?

*edit*

Thank you, and God Bless All who are in pain, going through withdrawal with pain, or know someone in Pain because of not being able to get their necessary medication to manage their pain and attempt at a somewhat normal life.

pabb
03-25-2009, 09:50 AM
mrsd may remember this, from a dif board, several years ago....
one member was so sick of being shorted that he invested in a postal scale, determined how much the full script and bottle should weigh and weighed, at the store, every time he picked up. if it was off, it had to be opened and counted.......

rosa2
03-27-2009, 02:43 PM
You should definitely notify the manager of the pharmacy department. When I first started having problems with chronic pain, I was shorted a few pills - I also have "boring" medications for colitis that no one would want to steal, and I found it significant that it was the pain meds that were short, not the others.... I decided to let it slide since I was dealing with so many other problems at the time. But from that point on I counted pills as soon as I got home and it happened 2 more times. I spoke with the manager of the pharmacy and told him in no uncertain terms that I suspected he had someone on his staff that was stealing medications either for themselves or for resale.
I can tell you that since that call I've never been short one pill ever again!

You need to report it - it is possibly a criminal activity! Rosa

jconner
05-03-2009, 04:13 PM
I sEE ITS BEEN A LONG TIME SINCE YOU POSTED THIS BUT THAT IS WHY I DO NOT GO TO wALLGREENS OR cvs. I use smaller pharms because they know me personally. Ive been told "oh we DO NOT CARRY this drug, with a smirk on her face, but while shopping I talked to another lady shopping there and she was filling the same drug! actually this was at winn dixie but wallgreens does treat me badly

baseballfan
05-06-2009, 06:41 PM
Yes, I had a mom and pop pharmacy if my prescription was over 60 pills, many times they would give me like 37 pills or 42 pills. it got to the point that every time I had a prescription for over 60 pills I would get shorted my pills. My husband starting counting my pills and if I was short he would call the pharmacy and take my prescription over there and they would give us the pills that they shorted me on. This also happened to my friend who used the same pharmacy. Finally her and I both switched to Walgreens and I have never had a problem with my prescriptions being under counted.

Kate

Maddieg3105@aol.com
08-09-2009, 10:05 AM
I just started taking adderall and I went to the pharmacy on Friday to a "mom and pop" pharmacy and my script was for a 120 and they shorted me 20 pills. Of course they are closed on the weekend.... but I am just scared that when I call them tomorrow they are going to tell me to go to hell. It's my very first perscripton ever and how am I going to explain to my new dr that I have to get a early refill on a drug that he didn't want to give to me in the first place due to it being very addictive. And here I am sitting... if they dont correct the problem... I will already be out. And this is my thing... I have never taken this drug before. There is no damn way I could have taken that much. I took 20mg and that was enough for me. I am hoping since it was late Friday they can just count their supply and get the problem right. But knowing that I didn't count them right when I was there... I am prob just screwed out the of medication. I hear this is a commen problem with the techs taken pills... but I always thought that the pharmist counted them. I think that he was in such a hurry though that he just didn't count right. So what do I do if he won't give what is owed to me. I know I will not return to this pharmacy again... but how can you make a mistake and short someone 20 pills?? I can understand maybe one or two but twenty??? I made sure I faxed them first thing yesterday morning when I did count the meds....letting them know. We will see if the pharmacy is worth a crap!:mad:

suger0301
02-26-2010, 03:22 PM
Last Month for the first time ever I looked up my meds and each night took out exactly the amount needed for the next day and I new my med count was right.....well towards the end of the month I saw I was gonna be short 3 Kadian..my Valium and percocet were right on the money so since I have used CVS for year and never complained.......I thought (I could go in and talk to pharmacist and explain situation and the laughed in my faced and said they Never make mistakes....always had a double count....so I told them they just lost a **** of a customer and was switching to Walgreen s, and she just laughed again....rude as can be!
Well yesterday it was time to fill my percocet and I was on auto pilot and dropped it off at cvs before thinking...(had a very bad weekend, fall, babysitting two girls 8-9 so I was fried) and I picked them up went home and promply counted them (supposed to be 75) and guess how many was in the never make mistakes cvs??? 78 was how many!!!! How do you recommend I do with this info?? What do you think we can do?? Count with them???
Thanks in advance!!

I can't remember ever being shortened, but it can be possible

darkmlight69
05-25-2010, 05:37 PM
i have a question about a medicine, is phentermine (diet pill) controled med.? im asking this because dinuba ca, wallgreens gave me 10 pills less, i dont know what to do! help please!!!:confused

mrsD
05-25-2010, 05:49 PM
Phentermine (fastin) is a controlled med in U.S.

I can't say what it's status is in Canada. You should go back to the pharmacy for an explanation. There may be a limit on days supply where you are, or they ran out and gave you an IOU. If an employee shorted you, then you need to report it so internally that can be fixed.

bobinjeffmo
05-30-2010, 09:49 AM
I've learned to always check the actual amount I was suppose to get right on the spot (I use the drive through, but I check the quantity before ever leaving). On more than one occasion I've been shorted because they didn't have enough. The problem is, when it's a controlled substance, if you've been written 120 pills but they only have 65 pills on hand, the law requires that the doctor then writes a new script out. Then you hit problem number two which is your drug insurance that won't pay since they've already filled one of those script's for the month. Isn't this a doozy of a problem?

Welcome to one more thing you'll now get use to doing each time you're picking up your prescriptions - and that's the fact that you're the one who needs to double check/count so you make sure this kind of horrible mistake won't happen again. I'm sorry you've been burned, but for what it's worth, we've all been there too. Bob.

Last Month for the first time ever I looked up my meds and each night took out exactly the amount needed for the next day and I new my med count was right.....well towards the end of the month I saw I was gonna be short 3 Kadian..my Valium and percocet were right on the money so since I have used CVS for year and never complained.......I thought (I could go in and talk to pharmacist and explain situation and the laughed in my faced and said they Never make mistakes....always had a double count....so I told them they just lost a **** of a customer and was switching to Walgreen s, and she just laughed again....rude as can be!
Well yesterday it was time to fill my percocet and I was on auto pilot and dropped it off at cvs before thinking...(had a very bad weekend, fall, babysitting two girls 8-9 so I was fried) and I picked them up went home and promply counted them (supposed to be 75) and guess how many was in the never make mistakes cvs??? 78 was how many!!!! How do you recommend I do with this info?? What do you think we can do?? Count with them???
Thanks in advance!!

bfburkejr
06-25-2010, 03:01 AM
I was shorted 100 methadone 10mg once, but I get my meds and put them in daily reminder boxes for the entire month so i new that day. Upon counting hefound that he did indeed short me and appologized and gave me my meds. In most states if they are off even 1 pill for CII's they have to fill out lots of paperwork and if it happens more than a few times in a year they can have their licence suspended. Of course if they are over and not short then....
I also keep my controlled substances in a safe. I would suggest buying 4 plastic 7-day pill boxes and counting them when you get them. Very few pharmacicts will give you more pills at the end of the month especially. Best of luck. All pain sufferers are at the pharmacists and the doctors mercy. Best of luck. :) Brian

m72j74
07-07-2010, 03:07 AM
I am prescribed 180 percocets per month. My mom and pop pharmacist always counts them for customers. This particular time he brought out a bottle that was unopened that had 100 in it then he took another bottle with 100 and took out 20. He usually pours the leftover 80 from the second bottle into mine. However, this time he poured the 20 into mine and put it in my bag and handed it to me. He was on the phone and talking to other employees all at the same time. I did not realize what had happened til I got home and counted. I immediately called back and he informed me they never make mistakes. I tried to calmly tell him I did not think he did it on purpose but anyone can make a mistake. All I asked him to do was count his inventory. He said he would, however it has been four weeks, I have been out of meds for a week and he says he still has not finished his count. I feel like I am just screwed. It totally ticks me off that my insurance was billed for 180 but I was only given 120. Is there any agency I can call to report this and how can his inventory not be off? I am so upet about this and feel so helpless.

mrsD
07-07-2010, 06:12 AM
Yes, you can report it to the Board of Pharmacy in your state.

They will investigate it as possible diversion.

hurting
07-11-2010, 10:35 AM
I have come up short every other refill on my percocet 10-325 qty. 240 count.
I would be short 4-6 per refill. I changed pharmacy after this happen to me 6 times and no long have this problem.

When I brought this problem up to the manager at the old pharmacy she said that this has never happen that I must have miscounted. As I told her this was happening every other refill and it was the same pharmacist shorting me refills. All the other refills that were not short were done by other pharmacist. I was not very pleased with the way the manager handle this problem kind of saying that I was wrong not them. My video taping showing opening a sealed bag and then opening the pill container and counting out the pills which came up short was not enough evidence for her. I will not name the store chain but this is a national chain.

I told my wife this pharmacist filling thousand of scrips a day shorting 2 pills here 6 pills there many times a day can add up to making a couple grand a day on the side all at our expense causing our meds to be such a high price.

mamagoo
07-20-2010, 10:04 PM
Since I quit getting meds filled at local Walmart I havent had any problems except when I was going to change from Walgreens to USave drug store, had called USave and asked for prices on my meds I was given one price but when I got them filled the price was more than 2.5 what I had been told it would be. I refused to take them and went back down to Walgreens after finding out that my prescriptions had been "transferred" they had me speak w/pharmacist and he called doc and got new scripts and gave me better pricing on all of my meds.
My ordeal with Walmart was they actually filled my prescription with 3 different meds in the same bottle and when I took them back in come to find out none of the meds in my bottle of BP medicine was even a BP med. So needless to say that was the last time I got meds filled there and I got home and reported them. I know loosing my business didnt hurt them in the least but it was the last straw after being shorted on several occasions.

Lorraine1955
08-18-2010, 07:57 AM
Hi Junie, two years ago I was shorted my meds. My prescription (Avinza) was for 60 pills (one month's supply) and I only had 55. I must have counted ten times to make sure I wasn't wrong. When I called the pharmacy, the pharmacist was nasty and said they count the pills out three times so I had to be wrong. He kept insisting they were right and it was a narcotic (duh!!!) so they had to be careful. I was angry and besides myself; fortunately my husband works for the company where the pharmacy is located and spoke the the boss, who in turn told the pharmacist to recount the meds. The next I received a phone call to tell me I was RIGHT and they had an overage of five pills. If the pharmacist will not help go above him!!! They just don't understand. I hope all is much better for you, and God Bless. Lorraine:hissyfit::icon_smile:

hurting
08-18-2010, 04:07 PM
I just open my one months supply of oxycodone and was shorted 10 pills my scrip is for 240. This was a first for this drug store. I changed because of this happening to me several times at my old D.S. but I have never been short this amount before. I will be keeping a close eye from now on. This is a day + shortage for me.

Rrae
08-19-2010, 07:28 PM
Oh my!
Hurting, if i were you I'd do just like Lorraine did in the post above!
10 pills sounds suspiciously like 'skimming' to me!
They have an inventory and the sooner you make this known, the sooner, perhaps this won't happen to you OR others!

Skimmers make me SICK!!

For those of us in REAL legitimate pain and under pain management, being even ONE day short is NOT a good thing. We do everything we are supposed to do to stay under legitimate pain management, so even tho this wasn't YOUR doing, in your Dr's eyes it could make him give you a sideways glance and you end up feeling the humiliation of 'taking to much'.......:eek:

Oxy is VERY much sought after on the street. Skimmers from pharmacy's need to be shoved in a sack and stuffed in a pill bottle marked "unsafe for public consumption" :mad:

Really. Hurting, I'd call the pharmacy.

hurting
08-20-2010, 07:26 AM
I will report the shortage but It has been 2 weeks ago when my wife picked up my scrips. I have been trying to cut back on the amount of oxy I take a day so I did not open this bottle as soon as I would have. My wife picked up my scrips. When I saw the bottle I new the amount was lite. I keep all my meds in a safe.

I just felt that since so much time pasted it would be hard to prove the shortage but yes I understand what you are talking about and agree that it needs to be reported some no one else gets shorted on their scrips.

I change to these store because the other store was doing this on every other fill but only 1 or 2 pills at a time. After changing for a long time I would count each fill to make sure the count was right. Being some what spacey form all the meds I have to take it takes me a while to count each scrip. This was the first time that I did not do the count right away since all the past was all correct. Mt fault but I fell I need to trust the people that fill my scrips. I was wrong and from here on in I will count my scrips the same day that I get them.

I will get with the store manager and make it clear that this has happen to me and that the next time it happens I will be back but this time it will be will a police officer along side me.

Thanks

Dennis

ginnie
08-20-2010, 09:19 AM
Hi, and It is good you lost the weight. Sorry about CVS. I had trouble with them too. I was taking Kadian too, was short two pills, well they gave me all kinds of ______. I have always been careful to not loose count, and to take them at the right time, so I don't make a mistake. CVS treated me like I was a druggie, just for having questioned. I switched to walgreens, hands down they are the best for me anyway. Not only do they listen, they call doctors for you, and really talk to you about your medications. I also told the one who I became friends with about the other pharmacy . She had indeed heard that our particular cvs had some issues. I had meds switched by my new Neuro, to another med, when I still had all of the other controlled substance. They didn't bat an eye, and wished me good luck with the new medication. I find them to be engaged with your health care. Ginnie

Rrae
08-22-2010, 09:59 AM
I will count my scrips the same day that I get them.

I will get with the store manager and make it clear that this has happen to me and that the next time it happens I will be back but this time it will be will a police officer along side me.

Thanks

Dennis

ABSOLUTELY!! I don't care if there is a line of people behind you.....I'd let the pharmacist know what happened and ask to have the bottle opened and recounted right there in front of you.
You get a bulk monthly supply and it's a lot of pills so, if there is a cheat at the store, this can be pinned down more easily (this IS a form of EMBEZZLEMENT).

MikeMiller
10-04-2011, 08:20 PM
I've been benefitting from this community for a while but finally decided to come forward and contribute.

I was recently shorted, big time. And luckily I caught it before I left the pharmacy, otherwise I would have been screwed.

Had a bad case of asthmatic bronchitis. Painful chest congestion, coughing, etc. So, my doc prescribed me some antibiotics, prednisone, and vicodin 10/650 for the pain. 40 vicodin with 1 refill for another 40. (I wasn't expecting there to be an extra refill, I've never had refills on vicodin for other painful encounters such as root canals, broken bones, etc). But Im glad I paid extra attention to it.

I double checked the labels on my bottle and the script for the vicodin said 0 refills available. If I hadnt paid extra attention to the "1 refill", I would have been shorted 40 pills. Granted, is a medication I don't like to take because it is more difficult weaning off it. But I still like to follow my doctors orders and take the medicine as prescribed.

If I would haven't noticed, I would have walked out the door, gone home, and the pharmacy would have done whatever it does with the prescription note (what do they do with them after the script is filled anyways? Send them back to the doctor like a cancelled cheque? Or keep them on file).

Anyway, if I had walked out, try wouldnt have still had my prescription note still on their desk.

So, I gave them the bottle back and showed them the discrepancy.

They fixed it for me, no questions asked. But who knows if it was an honest mistake or if the pharm tech was trying to pull a fast one. Because she could have filled that other refill for herself and it would have looked like a legitimate transaction.

My point is, make sure you know exactly how many refills you have and exactly when they come up. I like to write the refill date on my current bottle along with the number of remaining refills.

It seems a little paranoid to count your pills before you leave the pharmacy, I guess you just have to trust them. But as soon as you walk out the door and then come back to say you are missing pills or the label is inaccurate, they won't believe you, especially if you are dealing with the person that either made the mistake (because his or her ego is too big to admit a mistake) or worse, trying to conceal that he or she intentionally shorted you. They'll make you look like the crazy person.

I like to choose a pharmacy that isn't always busy. CVS is great because you can manage all that info either online or smartphone app.

Thanks for taking the time to listen to the story about my experience. I look forward to contributing more to this community.

Mike

jcrumb118
11-13-2011, 04:25 PM
First, I must tell you a little about my situation--I, like many others on here I have read about, am in pain every day. I live in Eastern Tennessee, and from what I have been informed, this is the worst place to live if you need pain medication because doctors here will NOT write a prescription for pain medication. I had to fight with my doctors office to get me into a pain clinic. I was with the pain clinic for a year and a half and was on morphine and loratabs. That clinic closed leaving me with no medications which put me back with my PCP. I am currently searching for another Pain management clinic with no luck of finding any that are taking new patients. So, I was forced to go out of state to a pain management clinic. I now have to drive 5 hours to be seen and get prescriptions. I just went on Friday to been seen for the second time at the new pain management clinic, was written prescriptions for pain management Oxycodone 30 mg., muscle relaxers, and motrin 800 mg. for inflamation. I then head out to the pharmacy only to be told they do not have the 30 mg oxycodone and that it is backordered and do not know when it will come in, that there is a shortage of this medication--not really a shortage but that the government regulates how much of this medication can be made each year and that number has been reached for this year and no more can be produced until next year, leaving a shortage of this medicaiton versus the amount of prescriptions that are being written. I end up back at the doctors office to go back in with the doctor so he can write my prescription for something else. I was originally supposed to get 120 30 mg oxycodone, and since no pharmacy had those (or were telling me they did not have them and were holding them for regular customers), the doctor checked with several pharmacies to find out what they did have. I ended up with 180 15 mg. oxycodone. Since 180 is the maximum they said they could write the prescription for, this means I am really getting 30 pills shorted for the month--the 15 mg. pills 180ct. = 90ct of 30mg pills. So, I had no choice but to take the lesser amount and then he wrote me for 60 Lortab 7.5 mg to help me get through the month. Now, I headed out to the pharmacy they told me to go fill the prescriptions with, fill out all the paperwork, give them my identification, answer all their questions and wait for them to fill my scripts. They way overcharged me for the prescriptions! The price was double what I have paid in the past, but again, I felt like I did not have a choice since I spent over an hour on the phone trying to find a pharmacy to fill my prescriptions with no luck. I get my prescriptions and start the 5 hour drive back home. A very long and tiring drive--I just wanted to go home and rest, I was in terrible pain from the drive and had to stop many times, even bought heat patches to put on my neck and back to try to ease the pain so I could continue home. It was late when I got home and I went to bed. The next day I got my prescriptions out and was going through them, the oxycodone bottle looked like it was not the right amount, so I counted them---they are 20 pills short, I count the lortabs and they are 10 short! I counted the motrin and flexirill pills and those were right on the money--correct, of course. Now I try to call the pharmacy to inform them of the shortage, and of course, they are closed! I have left a message letting them know that my pills were short and that they must already know this because their count will be over. I just have a feeling that this pharmacy is not going to call me back or laugh at me and tell me oh well......
After reading these posts, I feel I am not going to get anywhere with them. Who should I talk to next about this? This is a serious miscount on their part and serious shortage for me--I want to know who is over the pharmacies that I can contact about this shortage. I feel this was done intentionally--even number of pills being shorted--someone took those pills!(IMO). I am very upset right now--:mad: :( Who do I talk to and will it do any good? I do not have much hope right now, but I paid for my prescription, and way too much, they need to give me my medication. Anyone have any suggestions? And yes, I am going to find a local pain management clinic to get into, as quickly as possible.

mrsD
11-13-2011, 04:33 PM
Welcome to NeuroTalk...

The board of pharmacy in your state, is who to contact.

Contacting the owner of the pharmacy (corporate if a chain)
can be secondary... but often this is of no avail.

Most pharmacies double count controls with initials of the 2nd counter on the label.

Fraud does exist, but I don't believe it is that common with
computer filling and the daily logs all pharmacies keep today.

jcrumb118
11-13-2011, 04:42 PM
Welcome to NeuroTalk...

The board of pharmacy in your state, is who to contact.

Contacting the owner of the pharmacy (corporate if a chain)
can be secondary... but often this is of no avail.

Most pharmacies double count controls with initials of the 2nd counter on the label.

Fraud does exist, but I don't believe it is that common with
computer filling and the daily logs all pharmacies keep today.


I know most pharmacies double count the prescriptions, and I looked at all of my prescription bottles, NONE of them were initialed. Anytime I have gotten a prescriptions, and especially for pain medication, the number is circled and the pharmacy tech has initialed it. These prescription bottles do not look like they were double checked. I wish I had looked at the prescription bottles before I left from there. I didnt even open up the stapled bag! A big mistake on my part! BUT, I felt that of all the people in the medical field, you should be able to trust the pharmacy that fills your prescriptions. I never even thought for a second that there would be any problems. A guess that is a hard lesson for me :(

ginnie
11-13-2011, 05:04 PM
So sorry that happened to you. I hope you can find a pain clinic near to your home. there are shortages of medications going on. Mrs. D was correct in telling you who to contact. If you cannot get the meds. toward when you run out, don't hesitate to use your local hospital. You can documment what happened, times and dates, location of the pharmacy. I know what it is like to be in pain. I have not had this happen to me, and I wouldn't like it if it did. I live in Fla. and the controls are very tight. I do go to a pain management doctor. I wish you all the best. ginnie

ElizaJane23
11-14-2011, 09:36 AM
I ask my pharmacy to count my Schedule II meds in front of me. I pay for the prescription, check the label to make sure all is well, then ask the cashier to hand the bottle to the pharmacist. I do everything out in the open, being sure that the camera can see my actions - I don't let the prescription bottle get anywhere near my body, so no one could say I made a swap. I sometimes have to wait 10 minutes or so for the pharmacist to be available but that's no problem. Then the pharmacist counts out the pills in front of me. They never have seemed to mind doing this - I tell them I have to keep a log for each pill I use, so I always want to be sure I'm starting out with the right amount. I left Safeway because some always seemed to be missing and then started doing the pill counts at this new pharmacy. Haven't had any problems since the changing pharmacies.

Kitty
11-14-2011, 09:40 AM
I ask my pharmacy to count my Schedule II meds in front of me. I pay for the prescription, check the label to make sure all is well, then ask the cashier to hand the bottle to the pharmacist. I do everything out in the open, being sure that the camera can see my actions - I don't let the prescription bottle get anywhere near my body, so no one could say I made a swap. I sometimes have to wait 10 minutes or so for the pharmacist to be available but that's no problem. Then the pharmacist counts out the pills in front of me. They never have seemed to mind doing this - I tell them I have to keep a log for each pill I use, so I always want to be sure I'm starting out with the right amount. I left Safeway because some always seemed to be missing and then started doing the pill counts at this new pharmacy. Haven't had any problems since the changing pharmacies.

That's a good idea. If they have nothing to hide then they shouldn't mind recounting the pills. :)

mrsD
11-14-2011, 10:28 AM
Counting pills publicly sends a message to other customers who see this in action. It tells THEM that this store has "problems".

Dr. Smith
11-14-2011, 01:21 PM
If they have nothing to hide then they shouldn't mind recounting the pills.

I think they'll mind.... plenty, even if they won't admit it. Especially if it's a busy pharmacy with people waiting and some (facetiousness intended) blankity-blank customer tying up a pharmacist counting out pills. :ranting: It's like waiting in line at the bank while an eccentric counts out their pennies one at a time. :Doh:

I agree with mrsD , even though some customers are apt to get a different message - that the pill counter is just a crank. Nevertheless, there really isn't a better way of assuring accuracy (whatever the reason).

I've been called a crank (and worse) for asking for a receipt when I return a video at the local video rental, but several years ago, at what was touted as a "fool-proof" computerized scanning system, I got called TWICE (different incidents) claiming I'd not returned movies, and had to drive the 10 miles to the place to prove to them that I had - both times it was right on their own shelves, but they were too sure of themselves to go check. They offered me a free rental as apology, but I argued :hissyfit: them up to 5 for my time & mileage. :D

Cuss what anybody thinks. :ranting: :hissyfit: Count the pills (though I wouldn't hold out any hope for free meds or even a discount). If the pharmacy has a problem, it'll get fixed when it starts effecting their bottom line. If the shortages can be proven & documented, an investigation is more likely to change things.

Doc

MissTT
03-19-2012, 03:03 PM
I know most pharmacies double count the prescriptions, and I looked at all of my prescription bottles, NONE of them were initialed. Anytime I have gotten a prescriptions, and especially for pain medication, the number is circled and the pharmacy tech has initialed it. These prescription bottles do not look like they were double checked. I wish I had looked at the prescription bottles before I left from there. I didnt even open up the stapled bag! A big mistake on my part! BUT, I felt that of all the people in the medical field, you should be able to trust the pharmacy that fills your prescriptions. I never even thought for a second that there would be any problems. A guess that is a hard lesson for me :(
I know this post regarding getting shorted on pain medicine is a bit old, but just wanted to say that this has also happened to me. I went back to the pharmacy immediately and reported this to them and they told me the same thing about them being double-counted. Even worse, they then refused to fill any more prescriptions for me...as if I had done something wrong! I would have thought they would want that information in order to keep an eye on their techs. As it turned out, I have noticed that years later the tech that filled my 'short' prescription was no longer working there and has bounced to 2 other pharmacies in a few years. Living in a very small community I also know that tech had pain problems herself. The point of my story tho is to suggest that you request the pharmacy to fill you prescriptions in the sealed original bottles whenever possible, and count the others in person before you leave. It DOES happen that they can be short--even at very reputable places. Good luck to you; I had to learn the hard way too! MissTT

thinkitdoit7
03-23-2012, 10:20 AM
I am so glad I found this thread even though it is old because I have been shorted 60 oxycontin on a 90 pill prescription - I immediately called the pharmacy and asked to talk to the main person in charge.

I told them that I was missing 60 pills and that this kind of mistake with a highly regulated drug concerned me and that I was calling the police because I thought they should be involved.

I didn't mean to threaten the pharmacy - it was a Walgreens and I had been doing business with them for over 10 years with my Oxycontin prescriptions and never had a mistake - so I was truly concerned about someone taking the pills who might need help etc....

The pharmacist (a new guy I had never worked with before) told me not to call the police and he would have the pills ready as soon as I wanted to pick them up.

I told him that was fine but asked about tracking and that the total count at the pharmacy for Oxycontin 10mgs should show that there are 60 pills over -

He kept telling me not to call the police and was very afraid - I could tell from his responses.....

Then I had another run in with this guy when he filled my short acting oxycodone prescription and I found several oxycontins mixed in with the 5mg oxycodones - I didn't know what to do -

I also had picked up my Oxycontin prescription on one day and three days later went to pick up different prescription and they gave another, duplicate Oxycontin prescription - I gave it back immediately and told them it was a mistake....

I also was supposed to get a prescription for flexeril and when I took the bottle out of the bag it was a prescription with my name and address etc for Exalgo 12mg tabs -

So something is going on at this pharmacy - and although I do not like to make assumptions - it seems to happen with just the one pharmacist -

So in all the years I have been getting prescriptions at Walgreens I have had no problems until last year when this new pharmacist started and since then I have had so many issues with highly regulated drugs....

In retrospect I think I should call the police and just let them know what has happened - even though I don't have proof - just to make them aware in case anyone else has had problems -

If this happens to anyone taking highly regulated medications - I think the first phone call should be to the police - even if it is only three pills - that is alot of problems for people who need these meds daily/hourly etc.

Any thoughts on this - calling the police and letting them know what has been happening?

Thank you - K from WI

mrsD
03-23-2012, 10:42 AM
When this type of thing happens in a pharmacy you should report it to the State licensing bureau. They will investigate errors and esp Controls like this.

It is best to take a photo of the error bottle, or at least keep it,
for evidence.

This experience of yours is fairly extreme and uncommon. Something should be done. The police can only enforce criminal laws. They don't really have juristiction over professional behaviors unless you die, or are approached outside for illegal sale etc. I would contact Walgreen's customer service, completely bypass the store managers etc, and report this behavior, so Walgreen's can put in their cameras, or turn them on etc. Most big chains have secret security that can tape employees on the counter. Then they have evidence to proceed.
If you threaten the employees, pharmacist or manager, they will stop their stealing and be harder to catch. By going around them, you can set a wheel in motion to fix the problem a different way.

Be organized in your complaint, have photos of the bottles, initials of the pharmacist, dates, times etc, so they can go back on the schedules to see who was working at which time.

ginnie
03-23-2012, 01:17 PM
Mrs. D is right about the state, but I would also let the police know that something is not quite right. If you should ever be in this situation again, they would have a record. Also from now on, don't leave the counter, and look and count the meds you get right in front of them. You are right they are regulated, and doctors don't give new scripts if something happens to them. It may be honest mistakes, but you need to cover your hind end. I go to walgreens too, trust my pharmacist of 10 years to a max, but I look at all meds before I leave. Take care. ginnie

lickablesword
03-28-2012, 05:00 PM
I went to CVS to have a script filled. They told me it would be 24 hrs because it's a compound. I came back 3 days later and they hand me a cream(not a compound) I asked if it was a compound and they said no. I said it was incorrect and they said it was correct. I asked why the person said I would have to wait 24 hrs and they said they do not know. I called the doctor and she confirmed it should have been a compound. The doc called CVS to have it filled correctly. Had to wait 24 hrs again. Went in 3 days later and they charge me again even though they did it wrong at first. They claim they can't take medicine back. When I get home to apply the cream it looks noticeably different than what I'm used to seeing and it seems like it's not an ample amount of the active ingredient(steroid) I want to know if there is an agency to measure the ingredients in my script?

mrsD
03-28-2012, 05:12 PM
I went to CVS to have a script filled. They told me it would be 24 hrs because it's a compound. I came back 3 days later and they hand me a cream(not a compound) I asked if it was a compound and they said no. I said it was incorrect and they said it was correct. I asked why the person said I would have to wait 24 hrs and they said they do not know. I called the doctor and she confirmed it should have been a compound. The doc called CVS to have it filled correctly. Had to wait 24 hrs again. Went in 3 days later and they charge me again even though they did it wrong at first. They claim they can't take medicine back. When I get home to apply the cream it looks noticeably different than what I'm used to seeing and it seems like it's not an ample amount of the active ingredient(steroid) I want to know if there is an agency to measure the ingredients in my script?

It is a very good idea to photocopy your RX before taking it in the pharmacy. Then these questions would not arise.

You can always request to have a COPY of your RX given to you from the pharmacy. Then you would know exactly what you were prescribed.

If it is a recipe with more than one ingredient, you could see that.

Jo*mar
03-28-2012, 05:24 PM
I would call the store management also, they need to know that this person is "messing up" - it is a safety issue for the store as well as possible legal issue.




I am so glad I found this thread even though it is old because I have been shorted 60 oxycontin on a 90 pill prescription - I immediately called the pharmacy and asked to talk to the main person in charge.

I told them that I was missing 60 pills and that this kind of mistake with a highly regulated drug concerned me and that I was calling the police because I thought they should be involved.

I didn't mean to threaten the pharmacy - it was a Walgreens and I had been doing business with them for over 10 years with my Oxycontin prescriptions and never had a mistake - so I was truly concerned about someone taking the pills who might need help etc....

The pharmacist (a new guy I had never worked with before) told me not to call the police and he would have the pills ready as soon as I wanted to pick them up.

I told him that was fine but asked about tracking and that the total count at the pharmacy for Oxycontin 10mgs should show that there are 60 pills over -

He kept telling me not to call the police and was very afraid - I could tell from his responses.....

Then I had another run in with this guy when he filled my short acting oxycodone prescription and I found several oxycontins mixed in with the 5mg oxycodones - I didn't know what to do -

I also had picked up my Oxycontin prescription on one day and three days later went to pick up different prescription and they gave another, duplicate Oxycontin prescription - I gave it back immediately and told them it was a mistake....

I also was supposed to get a prescription for flexeril and when I took the bottle out of the bag it was a prescription with my name and address etc for Exalgo 12mg tabs -

So something is going on at this pharmacy - and although I do not like to make assumptions - it seems to happen with just the one pharmacist -

So in all the years I have been getting prescriptions at Walgreens I have had no problems until last year when this new pharmacist started and since then I have had so many issues with highly regulated drugs....

In retrospect I think I should call the police and just let them know what has happened - even though I don't have proof - just to make them aware in case anyone else has had problems -

If this happens to anyone taking highly regulated medications - I think the first phone call should be to the police - even if it is only three pills - that is alot of problems for people who need these meds daily/hourly etc.

Any thoughts on this - calling the police and letting them know what has been happening?

Thank you - K from WI

ginnie
03-28-2012, 06:48 PM
Welcome to Neuro Talk. I am glad you found this site, and I hope a few people join into this dicussion. what happened to you at CVS is strange. Usually this kind of thing doesn't happen. When you pay for these expensive medications, it hurts the pocketbook when theymake a mistake. Since they would not take the medication back, and they did make the mistake, you could write to the company headquarters. I don't know anyone these days, that can afford to re-purchase medications. Please docoument all that occured.
I really am sorry this happened to you. I look at all medications before I leave the store these days and make sure it is correct. That is about the only way we can protect ourselves from errors. ginnie

mrsD
03-29-2012, 07:31 AM
Just a note:

If you suspect someone is STEALING drugs, it is best to call corporate and the state. If you call the store management, you are tipping them off that you suspect, and they will stop for a while and be harder to catch.

Corporate for chain stores, has security and they have cameras and will watch the employees that way to gather evidence. They may send in "shoppers" who are paid to evaluate service as well.

I have worked in places where the management was the culprit stealing and in cahoots with others. So going around THEM is best. For errors in dispensing, that seem too frequent, I'd contact the state licensing and they will investigate your complaint. It is best to have evidence to show them. Dates and times of the fill and the error bottle and contents. Each pharmacist is licensed by the STATE, and if they lose this license from negligence, they can no longer work. The state has the most power in this kind of situation.

MalindaK
03-29-2012, 07:48 AM
Last Month for the first time ever I looked up my meds and each night took out exactly the amount needed for the next day and I new my med count was right.....well towards the end of the month I saw I was gonna be short 3 Kadian..my Valium and percocet were right on the money so since I have used CVS for year and never complained.......I thought (I could go in and talk to pharmacist and explain situation and the laughed in my faced and said they Never make mistakes....always had a double count....so I told them they just lost a **** of a customer and was switching to Walgreen s, and she just laughed again....rude as can be!
Well yesterday it was time to fill my percocet and I was on auto pilot and dropped it off at cvs before thinking...(had a very bad weekend, fall, babysitting two girls 8-9 so I was fried) and I picked them up went home and promply counted them (supposed to be 75) and guess how many was in the never make mistakes cvs??? 78 was how many!!!! How do you recommend I do with this info?? What do you think we can do?? Count with them???
Thanks in advance!!



CVS is so big that I don't think a complaint to them would count for anything. They are partr of Caremark arent they? there is only two big games in town, CAremark and Medco.

Do you think a pill diary would help? tracking each refill with numbers? I have found documentation on anything would help support what you are trying to accomplish.

Malinda

ginnie
03-29-2012, 08:46 AM
Yes Malinda, count the pills at the store in front of them! over what you need or under what you need, the count should be correct. I do this each refill. I did have a pill shortage, and since I documented the medication each day, I never figured it out. I do keep that journal people talk about. so it taught me to be extra careful. Two days without one of these meds. and you don't feel so good. However, no store or pharmacy should be rude. They should accept this proceedure from you and counting the pills and all. We need to protect ourselves. I also get 3 scripts, with other meds. at the same time. I didn't count the number of scripts I got, and wound up with one missing. Now I count scrips and document them too as Mrs.D stated. I still wonder what happed to that "other script" did an office worker take it?????? My house mate still thinks that is what happened. My doctor did re-write that one, only because he knows me for a long time now. he knew I didn't do anything wrong so I got lucky, and grew more carefull all at once. ginnie

mrsD
03-29-2012, 08:51 AM
The large corporate chains have security teams for just this
sort of problem. Just because they are "large" does not mean they will not act. In fact, a complaint that has evidence and validity will be accepted IMO. But if you suspect any pilfering, or diversion at a store, you must go around the local management and instead to corporate level.

For chain negligence--incompetence, I'd do both, the State and corporate. Chains pay for shopping services to pose as customers and evaluate service delivered. "Shoppers" can be very helpful in cases like this as well.

Smaller chains, or independent pharmacies are another thing altogether. They do not have the same resources for security.
In the case of an independent, I'd go to the state licensing bureau.

Dr. Smith
03-31-2012, 03:00 PM
I agree with MrsD on this issue, and I think contacting police would be counterproductive, and here's why:

If legal authorities are brought in, the issue becomes extremely public (they love getting press for drug busts of any kind - it helps their budgets), and could instigate an unwarranted witch-hunt that could hurt many responsible pharmacists, employees, and PATIENTS.

Corporate/state entities will most likely handle things quietly and internally, getting rid of the bad while causing the least harm to the good pharmacists and patients.

Doc

ginnie
03-31-2012, 03:58 PM
What if someone is truely messing around in the pharmacy? Messing with a controlled substance is a felony. Don't we have an obglitation to do the right thing to report it?. I really don't know doc, I am just throwing that idea out there. I would hate to have one of the assistants intentionally doing the shorting. I really don't know what I would do. I did get one whole script less one time, didn't count the number of scripts for the "Months" I signed for. He did trust me, and I always wondered where that script went to. Did I drop it knowing how important it was to me? or was their a printing error? Their PC said it was printed out. So in that case an office worker? I never figured it out. I was just plain lucky My doctor knows me as well as he does. I hope this does not happen to anyone. Check meds before leaving doctor with scripts, and at the pharmacy!. ginnie

mrsD
03-31-2012, 04:39 PM
What goes on in a pharmacy behind the counter, is PRIVATE business. A pharmacy is not a public place...it is private property. When the theft LEAVES the premises, then a crime has been committed. This goes for shoplifting too. A store can choose to not press charges you know in some crimes as well.

It is up to the owner/owners to oversee its functions.

If you know of large amounts of controlled drugs LEAVING illegally the place of business...you see transactions happening in the parking lot, or see things after hours....then you can call police. Outside is a public venue. It is illegal to have unlabeled drugs on your person (without a legal prescription vial) and you can be arrested for that. Pharmacists may be excluded, if transfer paperwork is present, say moving a small item from one store to another.

Most likely for large problems the DEA would be the one to do it.
In robberies, the DEA is often one of the agencies involved in the investigation.

But if you just suspect things, with no evidence, you need to get EVIDENCE before you blow any whistles. You have to prove it was not an "error" or professional mistake. And corporate is the one to gather this evidence and decide to call the authorities. The drugs belong to corporate.

It can get pretty complex....but in 40 yrs I have NEVER seen or heard of police being involved other than in robberies at the counter (by criminals) or break ins after hours. We call the police on theft from the floor and shoplifting, or disorderly conduct. I've been the one called into problem places when the pharmacist is being removed from duty. This is usually done by surprise, so they don't know what is happening.
But many times I've been the one to come in after, and clean up so to speak. I've seen many things over the years. And it is not common or pleasant.

Dr. Smith
03-31-2012, 05:48 PM
I really don't know doc, I am just throwing that idea out there.

That's fine. I'm just responding with my own personal opinion. ;) Every situation has at least 2 sides (and sometimes more). I try to see things from all sides (though I don't always succeed) and from a broader perspective. Sometimes I even play devil's advocate for the sake of examining an issue from different perspectives.

In this case, I truly believe that more people - mostly honest patients - would be hurt, and have more to lose, by a public witch-hunt of a pharmacy, just as they do in a witch-hunt of a pain clinic. The "bad guys" are a small minority compared to the large majority of honest patients in need who will suffer as a result of a pharmacy being shut down for even a day.

I wouldn't want cops storming my pharmacy (terrifying the bejeebers out of sick people) and digging into peoples' personal private medical records because they're "looking for evidence of a crime".

The system in place (as I understand it) is to notify the state or corporate as MrsD has stated. IMO, give that system a chance to work as it's intended. Granted, "the system" doesn't always work, so if it doesn't, try to find out why, and proceed from there.

That's my nickel. (2 adjusted for inflation) :D

Doc

ginnie
03-31-2012, 08:20 PM
It is good that you have had knowledge with this stuff. Thanks for the informaiton. I know for myself, I am going to be very careful. I am glad I know my pharmacy and have been with them for 15 years, same guys. I consider that a blessing! I would never switch thats for sure. ginnie

Dr. Smith
06-21-2012, 01:10 AM
This story rang a bell when I read it, then I reviewed this thread. The story speaks for itself.

Ex-pharmacist accuses CVS of risking patient safety
http://www.abc27.com/story/18668662/ex-pharmacist-accuses-cvs-of-risking-patient-safety

Doc

mrsD
06-21-2012, 01:33 AM
Just take a look at the new Walgreen's TV commercial!

It is a typical attitude of chains and their idea of professionalism.
I wonder how they think pharmacists can even leave the counter, when
there is no way to even fill all the RXs in each day safely.

In a typical pharmacy today, there are no breaks, no lunch time, no sitting down for the whole day (which can be 13hrs), reduced or no tech or clerk help, (cutting payroll costs). Target is a lone wolf, today, in that they close the pharmacy for 1/2 hr each day, so their employees, can have at least that short break to eat and rest a bit.

I find it ironic that this article comes from Harrisburg, Pa. Home of RiteAid.

One should always check their prescriptions! Always. In fact you should photocopy your RX before taking it into the drugstore, in case your doctor has made an error, and that error is not identified. It will serve as a record for your quantity ordered and refills.

flygirl7
07-01-2012, 05:15 PM
As a pharmacist, I'm sorry you were not treated respectfully. Could have been a really bad day there at the store, and let me tell you, those are frequent! Standing all day, people yelling at you, people complaining about prices, dealing with technicians, phone ringing off the hook, and God forbid you work a store with a drive-through like it's fast food....more goes on there than most people realize.

With CIIs, most stores have a double-count policy. However, when you're taking large quantities, it's hard to count accurately--I mean, some cancer patients are getting quantities of #270. Try to count those without interruptions!

So, it was never an insult to me when a patient asked for another count. Just realize that that takes more time, so be willing to sit down and wait a bit and the response to you will probably be more positive. It's all in how you position the situation. We know who the abusers are, and we also know who the truly sick people are.

ginnie
07-02-2012, 11:00 AM
You job is most difficult. I appreciate what you do. My own pharmasists have been my friends for over 15 years. Not only do they care about me, they are willing to show me how to give injections, and really look out for me. When I was looking for new pain management. He took me aside, and actually told me privately who NOT to go see. I was so every grateful. In fact both of them hugged me when I told him who I picked. They do know who are the legitamat docs. and who are docs. that may have some bad behaviors. Even if I move 40 miles away, I will travel back here, just to have them in my corner. They have been a blessing in my life. ginnie:hug:

Stephen Downey
12-19-2012, 09:02 AM
My doc writes me a one month supply of painkiller. This month, with a lot of guests in and out I was not wanting that much in the house. I paid for the o
Lot and asked the pharmacist to keep half of them until today. I guess he filled them and put them on the shelf in the ready area, because when I went get them they were gone.

It is a good independent, he gave me a weeks worth and will check with the other pharmacists to figure out what happened to them. Al least he knows me. It would be difficulty to go back to the doc,w explain what happened, and try to get a refill. Maybe even impossible.

I shudder to think if I had to go to a big bid pharmacy where you are nothing but a number.

mrsD
12-19-2012, 09:34 AM
Chains have a scan procedure and would show if the item waiting to be picked up was actually picked up. All that is logged.

Independents don't typically do that. However, if you paid in full with insurance? After a week most pharmacies put the RX back in stock every 7-10 days, to avoid billing when not picked up.
They would credit your RX however in the computer.

You need to find out more details on how things are done there.
Who would pick it up? Who would know it was there even?

Perhaps someone in the pharmacy? Or the record keeping was not done correctly.

It would be best to get your whole RX and lock it up or hide it, in your home, when visitors come and go. And don't talk about your medications to ANYONE. Even friends. They may tell others that you have desirable drugs in your home.

ginnie
12-19-2012, 11:44 AM
Not everyone cares to do this, but I invested in a small safe. Out of site out of mind, and worries are gone when you have company. ginnie

DonnaW1955
02-10-2013, 08:38 PM
I go to a small family run drug store for all of my prescriptions. Maybe they gave you the 3 they shorted you last month? I always count my pills, my husband thinks I am crazy...maybe I am!