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Psychiatric Service Dogs & Emotional Support Animals

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Unread 05-26-2010, 04:18 PM   #51
lilfarfa
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Originally Posted by Torra View Post
Hi everybody!
This is my firs time on forum here.
I have little situation here, and I'm not sure if I am in right place.
I have a condominium and I was away from it for 1,5 years, never thought i will move back there to live. When I was away(had a different life) ,I gotten a puppy ... Now my life situation has changed.I was in very obusive relationship where my puppy grow up with me, and she was the only support and companion for me there. Now i have got out of that hell and i have my baby(dog) with me.She is the closest life creature for me in this country( all my family still overseas) . I have to move back to my condo(cause i cant sell it in this days...) and have to have my dog with me,but....Association rules only allowing 20 lb dogs, and she is 82lb. I have submited letter to association,and it look like -after a moth they still don't have an answer for us. Somebody from building asked me if I am "that person with a dog"...,and sogjested that only way i can bring my "baby" to my condo it is to go to the psychiatrist and get letter from them about -my dog is my therapy dog for me... I have deal on all my problems always by my self ,but here I'm helpless ...
People,please, i need sogjestions ASAP, I don't know where to go with this,and how to deal with my situation.Have to be out of my friend house by end of May...
PLEASE WE NEED HELP! I can't be without my dog! She is everything for me! She dos not know any other "mom" then me...

Thanks for reading.

To have your dog in that situation, you must have an ESA letter. (Emotional Support Letter). You have to have a letter from your doctor stating that you have a disability and need the dog. If you go to the HUD website and search "Emotional Support Animal" they have an example letter of what the letter needs to look like. If you do not have such a letter, they can exclude the dog.
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Unread 06-19-2010, 08:19 PM   #52
sibley
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How can one go about finding someone to write these letters for you?

I'm moving 7 hours away to start law school in the fall and would like to bring my 8 year old lab. It's in a neighborhood that shuns dogs, just because the entire area is taken over by students due to the size of the university and documentation would obviously help. I don't want to live further away because I hate driving (and sold my car actually) and the possibility of being late makes my throat tight.

When I'm upset I go to her. She doesn't actually 'do' things to comfort me but she helps me to keep myself stable (I think because her ears go back and she looks so worried when I'm upset). She lived with my mom while I was in college but my mom thinks it'd be really good for me to take her especially since I'll be in a new area.

I have a psychiatrist but I've never really been satisfied with her or with the others I've seen in the past. I don't actually think she'd find this idea that lovely. I found the medications ineffective and the copays really unpleasant on my just-out-of-undergrad budget. Also, since I'm moving I won't be seeing that psychiatrist anymore... there has to be some easier way to go about this than seeing her and immediately finding a new one to agree to this right after moving.
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Unread 06-23-2010, 03:53 PM   #53
lilfarfa
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Originally Posted by sibley View Post
How can one go about finding someone to write these letters for you?

I'm moving 7 hours away to start law school in the fall and would like to bring my 8 year old lab. It's in a neighborhood that shuns dogs, just because the entire area is taken over by students due to the size of the university and documentation would obviously help. I don't want to live further away because I hate driving (and sold my car actually) and the possibility of being late makes my throat tight.

When I'm upset I go to her. She doesn't actually 'do' things to comfort me but she helps me to keep myself stable (I think because her ears go back and she looks so worried when I'm upset). She lived with my mom while I was in college but my mom thinks it'd be really good for me to take her especially since I'll be in a new area.

I have a psychiatrist but I've never really been satisfied with her or with the others I've seen in the past. I don't actually think she'd find this idea that lovely. I found the medications ineffective and the copays really unpleasant on my just-out-of-undergrad budget. Also, since I'm moving I won't be seeing that psychiatrist anymore... there has to be some easier way to go about this than seeing her and immediately finding a new one to agree to this right after moving.

If she doesn't actually do anything, then she is not a service dog, but can be an ESA if you are disabled per the ADA definition. Your treating physician has to be the one to write the letters. You do not have public access with an ESA but can live in no pet housing.
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Unread 01-30-2011, 08:11 PM   #54
PDBHDK
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Originally Posted by 36Monsters View Post
While trying to fly back home for Christmas, I found out, rather unfortunately, that Southwest Airlines is not therapy dog friendly, regardless of what the law says!
I made it all the way to Oakland California from Burbank with my dog, my letters from my doctor, my military ID, and all his applicable paperwork...but the airlines would not let me continue on to Boise, Idaho! Worse still was that they absolutely refused to let me make other arrangements with Southwest...
So, there I was, at ten at night, with no other flights leaving to Idaho until the next morning. I had to rebook through Delta, find a hotel for the night, and make sure that I was able to get back to the airport the NEXT morning to make my flight!
Southwest, the entire time, claimed that I had never shown them proof of my dogs paperwork and that I had been "Sneaking" him on board and that he was a disruption to passengers (which is bull puckey as he was NEVER out of his carrier while on the flight and had been sedated and was sleeping). OUTRAGEOUS! I had ALL his paperwork, had been CLEARED through Burbank, and had spoken with numerous gate agents along the way, all who assured me I was fine!
JUST AN FYI...Southwest has had a history of unreasonable removals of passengers from their flights...from people with wardrobe the airlines felt was inappropriate all the way to a poor man with Autism who was not only kicked off, but shuttled for 12 hours on various flights around the country while his frantic family tried to track him down!
When we spoke with Southwest representatives concerning this matter they said that it was against their policies to allow any animals on their planes, regardless of the reason. When I quoted the laws as outlined by the Americans With Disabilities Act as well as the medical documentation as supplied by the VFW, the response was "Well, you don't look like you have any disabilities..." Apparently you have to be physically disabled to be allowed by Southwest, and even that is probably a big IF.
I am an Afghanistan/Iraq war veteran with diagnosed bipolar and post traumatic stress syndrome. My dog is an emotional support dog who not only helps me with flying but from reoccuring night terrors and panic attacks. He has, on one very serious occasion, saved my life. This dog is NOT A PET, he is my life line.
Boycot Southwest. Fly Delta.
I just read your story about the trouble you had with Southwest Airlines. The employees who acted like that is dispicable. Unfortunately some people still believe that disabilities are only physical, like blindness or Cerebral Palsey.
I do have a question. You wrote that your dog is a therapy dog. Did you mean a Psychiatric Service Dog? I kind of assume that you did mean a PSD, but the two titles are very different.
If you can prove that you kept your dog in the crate and had all the paperwork, I think you should sue the heck out of Southwest. I forget if you mentioned the breed you have. I just tried to research a little about dogs in airplane cabins, and, at the very least Continental is very clear about their policy toward pets. I also looked up the Southwest Airline's pet policy, which was a little ambiguos, but the dog should have been allowed on the airplaine "Small cats and dogs are now (effective June 17, 2009) allowed to travel in the cabin of the aircraft on Southwest Airlines flights. The pet must be small enough to fit in an approved under the seat carrier. Each airline has different rules regarding pets in the cabin. There was no mention of a policy for PSD's, but that makes your story even more infuriating.
I'm not a lawyer, but I'm very passionate about the rights of people with invisible disabilities. I also don't remember the date that you had posted your story (memory issues directly related to my conditions), but I hope you don't have to go through an ordeal like that again.
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Unread 01-31-2011, 06:56 PM   #55
Jaspar
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How about not using the term "psychiatric", "emotional" or "therapeutic." Simply "Medical Assist Service Dog." They are not allowed to ask the nature of the disability (severe psychiatric disorders, by the way are MEDICAL) - they just may ask what the animal is trained to do for you. Some give the pat answer of "ameliorate my medical disability." If necessary talk about alerting to medical episodes, or whatever.

Therapy dogs are NOT protected under the ADA. Just Service dogs. Medical vs emotional. Here's a book.

Many medical conditions are "invisible" - such as epilepsy, meniere's, fragile bones, hearing loss, episodic fluctuations in blood pressure, heart conditions, and more. They are not allowed to ask the diagnosis.

Last edited by Jaspar; 02-01-2011 at 12:40 PM.
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Unread 05-01-2011, 07:49 AM   #56
cottonlouie
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OneMoreTime:

A doctor's Rx does NOT make an animal a service dog!!!! The SD MUST be trained to mitigate your disability so when you say "My dog qualifies as a SERVICE ANIMAL as she is necessary for me to live a bit more normally, organize my life, and provides me the courage to go places I need to go." it really sounds like you are living with a great pet, not a service dog. How is your dog trained to mitigate your disability? Please clarify.
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Unread 05-01-2011, 11:02 AM   #57
Jaspar
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Here is a wonderful LONG list of tasks a dog can be trained for in order to help mitigate psychiatric disabilities:
SERVICE DOG TASKS for PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITIES
It was written up by Joan Froling, Trainer Consultant, Sterling Service Dogs. The author of the It's Not Mental book talked about her and the use of such a dog (psychiatric service dog / medical assist service dog), even adding some to that list because of what the dog ended up doing for the child in the book. There were articles about the use of service dogs for a child with autism and a child with hallucinations and such in an IAADP newsletter years ago. These dogs were trained to "help mitigate disabilities."
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Unread 06-24-2011, 09:58 PM   #58
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Only the third link (Fair Housing) is still good.
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Unread 01-20-2012, 04:27 PM   #59
Paulb_47
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Default Therapy dogs

Therapy dogs are not one of the category of dogs that can stay with you. They must be 'invited' to the place where you take them. They do not have the same status as service dog.
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Unread 11-06-2012, 06:20 PM   #60
katmae
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I was wondering what other animals are used for emotional support I heard that some people use capuchin monkeys for this,if so dose anyone know how to get one I had a cat but he was no company at all talk about stuck up lol and I am scared of dogs, I live alone and do not go outside my home because it makes me have panic attacks my phych.thinks it would be good for me to have a monkey because it would be like a baby only it would not grow up and leave home,all my kids are growen and do not have time to keep me company any help on this would be most apersheated.
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