Go Back   NeuroTalk Support Groups > Health Conditions M - Z > Spinal Disorders & Back Pain

Spinal Disorders & Back Pain For discussion of all spinal cord injuries, spinal issues, back-related pain or problems.

To DUBIOUS

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 11-15-2012, 07:58 PM   #1
Leesa
Senior Member
 
Leesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,424
My Mood:
Default To DUBIOUS

Hey -- You answered someone's questions about their MRI, and now I have a question for you. But first, you said that a "spondy is due to a bilateral crack in the pars which disengages the vertebral body from the neural arch and allows the vertebral body to slide forward."

Well, when they do a laminectomy, they either remove the arch, or disengage the vertebral body from it (I'm not sure which but I know it's one or the other), so wouldn't that automatically make someone who's had a laminectomy become a spondy?? Seems like that would CAUSE the problem.

I'm confused. Can you explain it to me??? And of course in terms that this blonde can understand? Thanks. Lee
__________________
recovering alcoholic, sober since 7-29-93;severe depression; 2 open spinal surgeries; severe sciatica since 1986; epidurals; trigger points; myelograms; Rhizotomy; Racz procedure; spinal cord stimulator implant (and later removal); morphine pump trial (didn't work);now inoperable; lumpectomy; radiation; breast cancer survivor; heart attack; fibromyalgia; on disability.



Often the test of courage is not to die, but to live..
.................................................. ...............Orestes
Leesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-19-2012, 03:07 AM   #2
Dubious
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Paradise
Posts: 831
My Mood:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leesa View Post
Hey -- You answered someone's questions about their MRI, and now I have a question for you. But first, you said that a "spondy is due to a bilateral crack in the pars which disengages the vertebral body from the neural arch and allows the vertebral body to slide forward."

Well, when they do a laminectomy, they either remove the arch, or disengage the vertebral body from it (I'm not sure which but I know it's one or the other), so wouldn't that automatically make someone who's had a laminectomy become a spondy?? Seems like that would CAUSE the problem.

I'm confused. Can you explain it to me??? And of course in terms that this blonde can understand? Thanks. Lee
Hi Leesa,

Sorry, been out of town for the last 4 days. Yes, I did describe one of the four types of spondys; one with bilateral pars interuption. It's hard to describe without a diagram of consecutive articulated vertebra, but if you can get hold of a side and top view, it would help a lot!

While the posterior joints (facets) do not take much more than collectively about 30% axial loading, they are paramount in determining the direction in which the vertebra slide thru flexion and extension. To a considerable degree, they also limit the ability of the superior vertebra to slide forward on the inferior vertebra as they sort of lock the upper vertebra to the lower one in a dynamic way. The lamina (Rt and Lt) is the part of the neural arch, rearward to the facets while the right and left pars is the portion of the neural arch directly in front of the facets. So when the lamina are removed (for like a decompression of central stenosis), the facets are still intact and still attached to the vertabral body via the pars and continue to do their job. Questionable mild stability loss may occur, or not, because the ligamentum flavum (vertical ligaments that go from one lamina to another above and below) are also removed along with other postreior midline soft tissue and bony structures. In a spondy where there is spondylolysis or a "crack" in both pars, that occurs in front of the facets so there is a strucural loss of integrity that disengages the posterior from the anterior elements and then allows the upper vertebral body to slide forwards more or less on the lower one. The remaining essense of anterior stability then lies mostly upon the disc and ligamentous structures (ALL, PLL). Whether or not someone has pain from this is an entirely different question as there are Grade I-II spondys that are disabling and there are documented Grade III-IV (bigger and worse) that were incidentally found on x-rays done for other reasons than low back pain.
Dubious is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-19-2012, 03:47 PM   #3
Leesa
Senior Member
 
Leesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,424
My Mood:
Default

Boy, talk about "questionable" stability!!! After 2 Open laminectomies/discectomies, my spine went to HELL. Then the surgeon had the audacity to tell me that I could NOT hurt because he "had fixed me." These two levels he operated on were L3-4 & L4-5, so natch it just kept working it's way up.

Anyway -- Thanks for explaining it to me. That has always confused me. I think I understand it better now. Take care! Hugs, Lee
__________________
recovering alcoholic, sober since 7-29-93;severe depression; 2 open spinal surgeries; severe sciatica since 1986; epidurals; trigger points; myelograms; Rhizotomy; Racz procedure; spinal cord stimulator implant (and later removal); morphine pump trial (didn't work);now inoperable; lumpectomy; radiation; breast cancer survivor; heart attack; fibromyalgia; on disability.



Often the test of courage is not to die, but to live..
.................................................. ...............Orestes
Leesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dubious honor Blessings2You Pets & Wildlife 6 04-22-2011 06:53 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:21 PM.
Brought to you by the fine folks who publish mental health and psychology information at Psych Central Mental Health Forums

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment
provided by a qualified health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.


Powered by vBulletin • Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.


All posts copyright their original authors Community Guidelines Terms of Use Privacy Policy
NeuroTalk Archives