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Do people with tremor dominant PD respond to different meds than people with stiffne

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Unread 02-15-2012, 08:03 AM   #11
johnt
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As far as I understand it, the Alberts's approach to forced exercise depends on the cadence (rpm) more than the effort. So, you could pedal slowly in a high gear, or pedal quickly in a low gear with both methods requiring the same amount of work and both getting to the same speed. But, as far as PD is concerned there is some evidence that the high cadence approach is better.

I have no experience of forced exercise cycling, but last year I built a machine to give me forced exercise of the arms. My stiffness reduced. But, interestingly, like Mr Budgies my tremor worsened. I don't know whether there was a causal relationship.

Has Mr Budgies tried the simple tremor reduction technique described in a recent thread? It helps me slightly.

John
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Current meds: stalevo(75 mg) x 4, ropinirole xl 16 mg, rasagiline 1 mg
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Unread 02-15-2012, 09:58 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by johnt View Post
As far as I understand it, the Alberts's approach to forced exercise depends on the cadence (rpm) more than the effort. So, you could pedal slowly in a high gear, or pedal quickly in a low gear with both methods requiring the same amount of work and both getting to the same speed. But, as far as PD is concerned there is some evidence that the high cadence approach is better.

I have no experience of forced exercise cycling, but last year I built a machine to give me forced exercise of the arms. My stiffness reduced. But, interestingly, like Mr Budgies my tremor worsened. I don't know whether there was a causal relationship.

Has Mr Budgies tried the simple tremor reduction technique described in a recent thread? It helps me slightly.

John
Thanks John, I appreciate your input, and it was interesting to hear your findings after your forced arm exercise last year. May I ask - did the tremor that resulted from that last a long time, by which I mean minutes after the forced exercise, or until the next day?

Whilst I understand the need to reach 60-80 rpm in order to make any real difference to the PD symptoms, I'm still thinking that if he poodles along at his own pace, on a daily basis, this has got to be good for him?

I did see the tremor reduction technique detailed here in a recent thread (which I now can't find), but as it said the relief only last seconds, I didn't mention it to my husband, (who is also called John). Having said that, I'm very pleased to hear it works for you, albeit in a small way.

We're in the UK too - are you anywhere near Devon by any chance?
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Unread 02-15-2012, 09:59 AM   #13
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Thanks John, I appreciate your input, and it was interesting to hear your findings after your forced arm exercise last year. May I ask - did the tremor that resulted from that last a long time, by which I mean minutes after the forced exercise, or until the next day?

Whilst I understand the need to reach 60-80 rpm in order to make any real difference to the PD symptoms, I'm still thinking that if he poodles along at his own pace, on a daily basis, this has got to be good for him?

I did see the tremor reduction technique detailed here in a recent thread (which I now can't find), but as it said the relief only last seconds, I didn't mention it to my husband, (who is also called John). Having said that, I'm very pleased to hear it works for you, albeit in a small way.

We're in the UK too - are you anywhere near Devon by any chance?
Sorry - just noticed your location, so ignore my last question!
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Unread 02-15-2012, 12:57 PM   #14
Nan Cyclist
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Distant future is fine. Where ever you are is a good place to start. If he can keep adding a few seconds or minutes each day or week, he'll get there, even it takes a long time. Worst case scenario is he gets more fit. I have no idea if his worsening tremors could be related to cycling/not cycling.

When I cycle inside, I both watch TV and listen to music so there is always a beat. Oddly enough (for a 66 year old woman) I can pedal most rapidly when I'm watching sports. Go figure.

Inspiring story: I met a guy last year who could barely walk. At age 81, he was over the limit for PFP but he begged to get in the program and his doctor finally said okay. I saw him again last week and he walked over to me, albeit slowly, and announced with a big grin that he had gone skiing the week before. Not far, no moguls, but he had gone skiing!
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Unread 02-16-2012, 05:54 AM   #15
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Distant future is fine. Where ever you are is a good place to start. If he can keep adding a few seconds or minutes each day or week, he'll get there, even it takes a long time. Worst case scenario is he gets more fit. I have no idea if his worsening tremors could be related to cycling/not cycling.

When I cycle inside, I both watch TV and listen to music so there is always a beat. Oddly enough (for a 66 year old woman) I can pedal most rapidly when I'm watching sports. Go figure.

Inspiring story: I met a guy last year who could barely walk. At age 81, he was over the limit for PFP but he begged to get in the program and his doctor finally said okay. I saw him again last week and he walked over to me, albeit slowly, and announced with a big grin that he had gone skiing the week before. Not far, no moguls, but he had gone skiing!
Thanks for the encouraging words Nan. I'll try and persuade my husband to get back on the bike.

After having said his arm tremors seem to have lessened since not cycling, last night they were bad again, so that's knocked that theory on the head!

As you say, the cycling must really do him nothing but good, so fingers crossed he'll keep at it.

When we see the neurologist at the end of April, I really don't want him to suggest an increase in medication to try and cope with the increased arm tremors, as from what I've heard the side-effects of increased meds are far worse thant the tremors themselves.

Would appreciate any further input from anyone please.
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Unread 02-18-2012, 02:24 PM   #16
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I try to bike every day, but am nowhere near the recommended pace or amount of time. I keep plugging away anyhow. I use an stationary recumbent bike (best with Ska reggae type music from free Pandora internet radio!), but am having difficulty maintaining speed due to sciatic pain in hip, plus a tendency to get winded quickly and lose energy. My tremor does sometimes worsen while biking fast, but goes away when I stop. I figure it's worth it, because some exercise should be good for general health reasons, even if not enough to be effective for possibly controlling PD symptoms or progression.
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Unread 11-21-2012, 01:21 PM   #17
Arsippe
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Originally Posted by budgies View Post
Thanks for that Nan, but surely even ten minutes of cycling daily to the best of his ability has got to be a good thing?

I don't know if we're imagining it, but since giving up the bike four days ago, his arm tremors seem to have improved slightly. Having said that, from all that I've read, I do think it's important that he goes back to the cycling and tries to reach the goal you've described, albeit possibly in the distant future.
Have any of you who are tremor dominant tried antichiolinergics. Also, can something non prescription like Benadryl help tremor?
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Unread 11-21-2012, 08:28 PM   #18
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I only use it to get a good night's sleep (when my tremor disappears). Haven't tried taking it during the day for fear of falling asleep with my face in my food.
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Unread 11-25-2012, 02:44 PM   #19
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I'm definitely tremor dominant, huge tremor. Briefly tried Artane, only because I really needed relief & nothing else worked, but got bad side effects (it's known for that). Benadryl not impressive. Haven't noticed improvement with exercise, but maybe I need to do it more & faster. Six years in, I've just about tried it all, but still found nothing for tremor relief. MDS Doc says I'll probably need DBS, but I'm chicken; hope something less scary comes along. Anyone have any tremor relief success stories?
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Unread 11-25-2012, 09:35 PM   #20
Arsippe
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I don't know....this is called one disease when some of us move too much and others move not at all.... Something is wrong with this diagnostic picture... Exercise seems to help a bit and sugar, on the other hand, cranks those tremors up. But I am not getting the theme here for tremor dominant sufferers....are we supposed to be helped by the same meds that help freezing? I'm just saying....
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