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Unread 11-28-2012, 09:31 PM   #131
Bryanna
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ginnie,

You have a NESBIT.... lol

Bryanna



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You will laugh at my post to Spork, I did it again!!!! This woman gets so confused!!!! ginnie
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Unread 11-28-2012, 09:46 PM   #132
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ginnie,

You have a NESBIT.... lol

Bryanna
Can I have one?
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Unread 11-28-2012, 09:57 PM   #133
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Rick,

What ginnie has is called a nesbit. This is a very small appliance that resembles teeth on an acrylic base and it replaces one to two teeth that are next to each other. You need to have "anchor teeth" on each side of the space to hold the nesbit in place. This appliance is easily removed just like a denture. It is not recommended that you eat with this because it is so small that you could swallow it. And it is not meant to stay in when you sleep, again because it can be swallowed. You may be a candidate for a nesbit if you are just going to replace tooth #3. Some dentists do not recommend these because they are small and can be a choking hazard. Others make them all the time and their patients love them! I've known many patients who do really well with them!

A removable bridge is very different than a nesbit. The bridge is fabricated to fit over existing teeth to make the teeth look better esthetically. This appliance is removable to clean. Your case does not warrant this type of appliance.

A removable partial denture is basically a larger nesbit. It can replace missing teeth on one or both sides of the arch at the same time. Here is a link with good pictures ...
http://doctorspiller.com/partial_dentures.htm

Hope this helps!
Bryanna


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Thanks very much for that. I'm not familiar with the concept of a removable bridge. Do they not have to grind down the neighboring teeth to accommodate it? What holds it in?

Thanks.

ETA: a Google search turns this up: http://denturesolutions.org/removable_bridge_work Is this what you're talking about? It looks like it covers all the teeth - not just the missing one and its neighbors. Is that right?

Thanks again.
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Unread 11-28-2012, 10:00 PM   #134
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Rick,

Yes, you could have a nesbit to replace #3. But it's important to understand the limitations of this type of appliance. The website I provided you shows a good picture of a nesbit.

Bryanna


QUOTE=spork;935403]Can I have one?[/quote]
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Unread 11-28-2012, 10:23 PM   #135
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Hmmm... unfortunately, the only reason I want a tooth there is for chewing. The missing tooth is far enough back that you don't notice it's missing.

In the link you provided I see:

"The design of the new flexible plastic framework takes the danger out of an accidental swallowing of the appliance. In the event that someone did swallow one, it is unlikely that any damage could be done to the lining of the digestive system."

So it sounds like maybe the swallowing hazard has become less of an issue.

It also says:

"Dentists used to build Nesbits for their patients all the time. They were composed of a single denture tooth (usually a back tooth) between two cast metal clasps which attached onto the teeth on either side of the missing one."

I would have thought it was intended for chewing if it's typically used on a back tooth, but then I've never even heard of one until today.

Given the root canals on the two neighboring teeth, it sounds like the best bet is to leave a hole there - right?
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Unread 11-29-2012, 09:48 AM   #136
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Yep I knew you would get a kick out of my once again mis-spelling....ginnie
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Unread 11-29-2012, 09:53 AM   #137
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Hi, in my case the dentist, said I could eat just fine with the nesbit. I have two teeth replaced, and firmly anchored in front and in back of the two missing teelth. I am careful however, lets say reasonable with its use. I do take it out at night. My dentist uses these all the time, and said at one time dentists did use them more. She is a firm believer in them. Her father, and two brothers are also dentists. I can't see anything negative about them at all. No carmel apples, steak, hard stuff to chew are the only draw backs I can tell. I sure hope it all works out for you. ginnie
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Unread 11-29-2012, 04:07 PM   #138
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Rick,

Nesbits are not meant to be used for chewing because food can get stuck on them, pop them out and that's when you could choke on it. If swallowed, the acrylic ones are more likely to pass through the digestive tract without getting caught as with the metal ones. Also, they have to fit snug or that too cause them to fall out and it's the choking thing that could be a problem. However, if you only eat soft foods while you have it in and you try not to chew on that side, you could leave it in with some confidence. Most of the patients that I know who have nesbits remove them during eating and then just pop them back in when they are done.

Chewing is not the real reason for a nesbit because you can usually chew most foods okay without one. The reason to have this appliance is to prevent the adjacent teeth from tilting in towards that open space which can mess up your bite and also to prevent the biting tooth (the tooth directly above or below this space) from drifting up or down into this space. Nesbits are space holders, for lack of a better definition, and for esthetics.

Removable partial dentures are designed for chewing as well as space holders and esthetic reasons.

Given the two other root canaled teeth, #2 and 4 in your case, it is not ideal to put an implant in between these two compromised teeth. It is also not ideal to put a three unit bridge there which would mean grinding down the two root canaled teeth. The trauma from the drilling on these guarded and fragile teeth could set off a huge problem. Also, when one or both of these teeth needs to be removed, the entire bridge becomes useless. It's usually not recommended because it's just not stable.

Bryanna



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Originally Posted by spork View Post
Hmmm... unfortunately, the only reason I want a tooth there is for chewing. The missing tooth is far enough back that you don't notice it's missing.

In the link you provided I see:

"The design of the new flexible plastic framework takes the danger out of an accidental swallowing of the appliance. In the event that someone did swallow one, it is unlikely that any damage could be done to the lining of the digestive system."

So it sounds like maybe the swallowing hazard has become less of an issue.

It also says:

"Dentists used to build Nesbits for their patients all the time. They were composed of a single denture tooth (usually a back tooth) between two cast metal clasps which attached onto the teeth on either side of the missing one."

I would have thought it was intended for chewing if it's typically used on a back tooth, but then I've never even heard of one until today.

Given the root canals on the two neighboring teeth, it sounds like the best bet is to leave a hole there - right?
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Unread 11-29-2012, 05:15 PM   #139
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Thanks for that detailed explanation. I now understand why one would use a nesbit - even though it's not good for chewing. I understand that it's probably not a good idea to choose any of the options that involve grinding the neighboring teeth.

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Rick,
Removable partial dentures are designed for chewing as well as space holders and esthetic reasons.
Looking at Wikipedia it appears that a removable partial denture does not require grinding my existing teeth. Would that make it a good option in my case?
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Unread 11-29-2012, 07:20 PM   #140
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Rick,

In your case based on the photos and xrays that you have sent to me.... you may not be a candidate for a conventional partial denture because you do not need to replace any teeth on the opposite side of the upper arch. Partial dentures replace teeth on both sides of the arch.

You may be a candidate for a unilateral partial which is designed to replace a tooth or teeth on one side of the arch. Some dentists are comfortable making these, others are not. You would have to discuss this with your dentist.

The basic idea is to avoid putting implants in areas that had root canaled teeth due to the consequences of the long term infection from those teeth. And also avoid using root canaled teeth as anchor teeth for a bridge.... for the same exact reasons. So ask your dentist what your other options are.... every case is different and not all dentists are comfortable doing all things.

Does that sound reasonable to you?
Bryanna




Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
Thanks for that detailed explanation. I now understand why one would use a nesbit - even though it's not good for chewing. I understand that it's probably not a good idea to choose any of the options that involve grinding the neighboring teeth.



Looking at Wikipedia it appears that a removable partial denture does not require grinding my existing teeth. Would that make it a good option in my case?
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