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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Thoracic Outlet Syndrome/Brachial Plexopathy. In Memory Of DeAnne Marie.

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Unread 01-23-2013, 10:26 AM   #151
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http://radiopaedia.org/articles/thor...utlet_syndrome

this page is awesome and has a lot of potential
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Unread 01-27-2013, 08:14 PM   #152
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I'm sure this applies to tos too


Symptoms of Raynaud's
A person with Raynaud's phenomenon can experience three phases of skin color changes: white (pallor), blue (cyanosis) and red (rubor). There is not a set order to the changes in skin color and not all people experience all three skin colorations.

Pallor (whiteness) may occur in response to the collapse of the arteries in an affected body part.
Cyanosis (blueness) appears because the fingers or toes are not getting enough oxygen-rich blood. Other symptoms that occur during cyanosis are feeling cold and numbness.
Rubor (redness) occurs as the blood returns to the affected areas. After an attack is over, throbbing and tingling may occur in the fingers and toes. Attacks of Raynaud's Phenomenon can last from less than a minute to several hours.
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Unread 02-04-2013, 11:12 AM   #153
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good link

http://erikdalton.com/thoracic-outlet-syndrome/

Below is a summary of component syndromes which comprise thoracic outlet syndrome along with a brief description of each.

Intertransversarii fibrosis: Consisting of rounded muscular and tendinous fasciculi running from anterior and posterior tubercles of the transverse processes of two contiguous vertebrae, reflex spasm from cervical joint fixations or facet ‘spurring’ (Figure 5) causes them to tighten and squeeze on spinal nerve roots. An often neglected site of nerve root compression, these tissues are usually easy to release using contract/relax stretching techniques shown in my Myoskeletal Volume III, Shoulder, Arm and Hand videos.
Anterior scalene tightness: Compression of the interscalene space between the anterior and middle scalene muscles frequently causes reflex spasm. This condition is primarily due to long-term nerve root irritation from spondylosis
or facet joint inflammation.
Costoclavicular approximation: Postural deficiencies and carrying heavy objects results in neurovascular compression in the space between the clavicle, first rib and musculoligamentous
structures.
Pectoralis minor tightness: Repetitive movements of the arms above the head (shoulder elevation and hyperabduction) frictions and irritates the nerve plexus between the pectoralis minor tendon under the coracoid process.
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Unread 02-08-2013, 11:24 AM   #154
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good list of types of tos

Cervical rib syndrome
Scalenus anterior syndrome
Costoclavicular syndrome
Hyperabduction syndrome
Upper thoracic neurovascular compression
Elongated C7 transverse process
Poor posture
Anomalous tissue overgrowth
Subclavian muscle hypertrophy
Costocoracoid tendon
Bone overgrowth following clavicle or first rib fracture
Repetitive occupational movements
Downward pressure on the shoulder girdle for extended time periods
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Unread 02-08-2013, 04:40 PM   #155
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http://physicaltherapy.rehabedge.com...le.aspx?m=1314

Due to prolonged forward shoulder or protracted scapular position, an individual who works posteriorly to the "new" scapular plane, can create anterior shoulder laxity. The repetitive stress to the structures of the anterior shoulder (biceps tendon, pec major, etc) can create inflammation in these tissues each time the humeral head is brought back behind the body or "new" scapular plane. You can assess this by looking at the scapular position in normal resting posture (patients tend to sit up straight when they are being evaluated...remind them to sit normally and comfortably...)look at the distance of the medial scapular border form the spine (greater than 2-3 inches and they are protracted). Grab the acromion (from front to back, in a pinch like grip) do the same with the humeral head. Compare the position of the acromial arch to the humeral head position. If you see the humeral head anterior to the acromion, they have a forward position.

If you find this stop any rehab activity or exercise you are doing that makes them extend the humerous beyond the limit of scapular movement (preventing anterior humeral glide and further stress). This includes any pec stretchs (especially corner or doorway positions) and row like activities. The patient's movement must be re-educated to include movement of both the humerous and scapula in unison, when moving backward into the scapular plane. Anchoring structures to the scapula should be addressed, most especially pec minor, while protecting the humeral head position. Stabilizing structures to the scapula need to be strengthened...again in such a way as the patient does not move the humerous without the scapula, and maintains a good scapular planal movement. Low traps especially. If there is medial border winging then serratus as well.

Thoracic posture can also be addressed, although I believe you need to address whole spinal posture to make changes...increased thoracic kyphosis can increase scapular protraction.

MOdalities can be used to calm down the anterior shoulder structures, but I might us iontophoresis with dexamethosone instead of IFC. Ice massage is great post too.

Mobilize the joint cautiously keeping in mind you already have anterior joint laxity...you do not want to create a multidimensional laxity. But check out the inferior and posterior joint capsule and posterior musclature for tightness...actively, they might be pushing the humeral head forward with stabilizing contractions...even external rotation exercises done without awareness can push it anteriorly...


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i used to ahve bicep tendonitis so this is pretty spot on for me
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Unread 02-16-2013, 11:00 PM   #156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mspennyloafer View Post
http://physicaltherapy.rehabedge.com...le.aspx?m=1314

Due to prolonged forward shoulder or protracted scapular position, an individual who works posteriorly to the "new" scapular plane, can create anterior shoulder laxity. The repetitive stress to the structures of the anterior shoulder (biceps tendon, pec major, etc) can create inflammation in these tissues each time the humeral head is brought back behind the body or "new" scapular plane. You can assess this by looking at the scapular position in normal resting posture (patients tend to sit up straight when they are being evaluated...remind them to sit normally and comfortably...)look at the distance of the medial scapular border form the spine (greater than 2-3 inches and they are protracted). Grab the acromion (from front to back, in a pinch like grip) do the same with the humeral head. Compare the position of the acromial arch to the humeral head position. If you see the humeral head anterior to the acromion, they have a forward position.

If you find this stop any rehab activity or exercise you are doing that makes them extend the humerous beyond the limit of scapular movement (preventing anterior humeral glide and further stress). This includes any pec stretchs (especially corner or doorway positions) and row like activities. The patient's movement must be re-educated to include movement of both the humerous and scapula in unison, when moving backward into the scapular plane. Anchoring structures to the scapula should be addressed, most especially pec minor, while protecting the humeral head position. Stabilizing structures to the scapula need to be strengthened...again in such a way as the patient does not move the humerous without the scapula, and maintains a good scapular planal movement. Low traps especially. If there is medial border winging then serratus as well.

Thoracic posture can also be addressed, although I believe you need to address whole spinal posture to make changes...increased thoracic kyphosis can increase scapular protraction.

MOdalities can be used to calm down the anterior shoulder structures, but I might us iontophoresis with dexamethosone instead of IFC. Ice massage is great post too.

Mobilize the joint cautiously keeping in mind you already have anterior joint laxity...you do not want to create a multidimensional laxity. But check out the inferior and posterior joint capsule and posterior musclature for tightness...actively, they might be pushing the humeral head forward with stabilizing contractions...even external rotation exercises done without awareness can push it anteriorly...


--------

i used to ahve bicep tendonitis so this is pretty spot on for me
I did the corner home exercises... Ouch... I would have to psych myself to get through them. Not sure they helped. I was in a bad shape when I was trying to do those. At this point, whiskey helped as much as anything else!!!
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Unread 02-18-2013, 10:54 AM   #157
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oh yeah i love a good drink every once n awhile
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Unread 03-10-2013, 11:41 AM   #158
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http://www.cef.co.nz/index.php?optio...icles&Itemid=5
these look good!


self-care
Key Mobilisers for the Cervico-Thoracic Junction
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Unread 04-10-2013, 11:00 AM   #159
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http://tosoverview.blogspot.com/

great tos blog, her shoulders are INSANE
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Unread 04-16-2013, 04:37 PM   #160
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2967689/

Interesting read on Pagets especially those who have repeat issues when Drs have been conservative
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