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Nicotine?

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Unread 02-12-2013, 12:10 PM   #1
swiftfoot55
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Default Nicotine?

Anyone have any thoughts on nicotine? I read a few articles stating it improved brain function in mice tests following a concussion.
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Unread 02-12-2013, 12:51 PM   #2
Consider
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Default Don't do it! Here's some tips!

No No No No! Dare I say it, double NO! Nicotine is straight up bad, bad for you and bad for the body, even if you don't have PCS. The way to feeling better, is changing the diet, including new vitamin regimen, reducing stimulation a bit, a tad bit of exercise if you can handle it, and not to mention cognitive rest.

Basically, no caffeine or stimulants. No alcohol. Just a clean diet with no artificial sweeteners or corn syrup. I personally now eat tons of organic foods and I feel a ton better. To relieve problematic mornings now which did work this morning, I eat some yogurt and then I take my vitamins and medicine. It eases my stomach and the taste of yogurt makes me feel happy and energized!

Feel better.
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Unread 02-12-2013, 01:12 PM   #3
swiftfoot55
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Nice of you to say that, but actually there is a science behind it.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12831873

Yes, this is just one example. I'm talking about actual nicotine, NOT cigarettes and their unwanted chemicals.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0807154735.htm

Here's another example.

I am not a biologist, but from what I understand nicotine indirectly increases dopamine levels in the brain. Possibly similar to the reason amantadine is prescribed for post TBI.
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Unread 02-12-2013, 01:50 PM   #4
Mark in Idaho
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The first study was extremely narrow in its scope. It is far from indicative of any benefit. The Controlled Cortical Impact is a poor attempt at a concussion.

The second article is about Parkinson's Disease. This is not applicable to concussion either.

Neither article establishes any guidelines for a therapeutic use of nicotine.

If you are having a hard time finding your way from room to room in your home, maybe some nicotine will help. BUT...... I doubt that is your problem. The mouse brain has a similar cell structure to the human brain but the processing of information is much more primitive in a mouse.
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59 years old, retired due to disability, married 34 years, father of three, grandfather of four, Suffered a serious concussion at 10 years old (1965) stopped most driving after concussion at 46 years old (2001), Post Concussion Syndrome/Multiple Concussion/Impact Syndrome with PTSD, immediate/short term visual and auditory memory problems, slowed processing speed, visual/auditory processing difficulties, insomnia, absence seizures, OCD, 14 concussions since first concussion at 8 years old, Taking paroxetine for 14 years and gabapentin for 12 years. Added L-Tryptophan and stopped paroxetine after 3 months of tapering. I currently take 500 mgs of L-Tryptophan AM, 500 mgs noon, and 500 mgs PM.


As of Nov 15th, Due to high stress issues resulting in PTSD, docs put me on 3 meds. Clonazepam but only for 30 days ) .125 mgs twice daily (Doc presc. .25 mgs 2x daily but half a tablet is good) , citalopram (Celexa), an SSRI , and olanzapine (Zyprexa), an atypical anti-psychotic that usually causes weight gain before bed. I lost over 30 pounds since mid July. It just stopped the weight loss. Took me off the gabapentin. I am feeling better than I have in years.

This great feeling only lasted a month. Back to the same old PCS doldrums.

May 2014, I am off the olanzapine due to a 6 fold price increase. Back on 600 mgs of gabapentin before bed.

I am also taking L-Theanine to help with GABA regulation


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Unread 02-12-2013, 02:24 PM   #5
swiftfoot55
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Interesting thoughts/opinions. I wonder what the draw down is to trying. If anything, it increases dopamine reception in the brain?
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Unread 02-12-2013, 05:30 PM   #6
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The concussed brain is more receptive to addiction. Nicotine is arguably more or as addictive as heroine. It passes the blood brain barrier easily. Has a very temporary affect with regard to dopamine. It also has a withdrawal symptom. Why would anyone not already addicted want to try an addictive, temporary guaranteed withdrawal product when they are experiencing anxiety, emotional lability, brain fog, pain, irritability...

Not sure this all that an intelligent thing to consider doing?
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Unread 02-12-2013, 09:59 PM   #7
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Why Nicotine? Are you suffering with depression with your PCS?

Why not discuss Wellbutrin with your Doc instead - it binds the receptors rather nicely, moreso than nicotine, and treats depression - you therefore will receive a win / win - raising the dopamine in your brain and getting some care for the depression without the nicotine worry.

Really, avoid Nicotine at any cost , if you can.
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Medication update: Topamax 200mg twice daily it seems to minimize daily headaches to a 1-2/10 quality(I still know they are there); and acute headaches erupt without warnings.
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Unread 02-13-2013, 09:51 AM   #8
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I started smoking again a couple of months ago. I think I smoke twice as many now as I ever did. It isn't helping. And I desperately want to stop.
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Unread 02-14-2013, 02:21 PM   #9
worried12378
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hi i just quit smoking and i feel so much better and healtier.

don´t smoke.

there´s nothing good about it.
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