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Projecting. Do others feel your emotions and thoughts?

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Unread 11-09-2009, 12:02 AM   #1
seeker83
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Default Projecting. Do others feel your emotions and thoughts?

Is there is disorder based on the belief that your experience is being felt by everyone you are around.. Basically is there any information of projecting thoughts and feelings unintentionally to people around you that interact in your reality?
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Unread 11-09-2009, 01:19 AM   #2
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That could be a part of delusions or psychosis, but I'm not a psychologist, I just took Psych 101 in college.

When I took steroids, I thought I looked strange or odd and I thought everybody else felt that way too.

I would guess that it's part of a lot of emotional problems from what I've read.
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Unread 11-09-2009, 03:22 AM   #3
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Projection is the main defense mechanism of paranoids.

Steroids can affect people who take high doses for various inflammatory situations.
Some people respond this way more than others. Typically the odd behaviors go away
when the drug is withdrawn.

Marijuana also can cause paranoid ideation in some.
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Unread 11-09-2009, 06:40 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsD View Post
Projection is the main defense mechanism of paranoids.
mrsD,

Yes, projection is a defense mechanism but I have a problem with the use of "paranoids."

Projection or transference can be related to life experiences related to trauma such as abuse (sexual, emotional, physical). These people are not paranoid or psychotic, they have been extremely hurt by others.
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Unread 11-09-2009, 08:32 PM   #5
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Seeker,
Here is a link that explains projecting/transference you might find helpful:
http://www.crisiscounseling.com/Arti...ansference.htm
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Unread 11-10-2009, 09:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoopy View Post
mrsD,

Yes, projection is a defense mechanism but I have a problem with the use of "paranoids."

Projection or transference can be related to life experiences related to trauma such as abuse (sexual, emotional, physical). These people are not paranoid or psychotic, they have been extremely hurt by others.
I agree with you Snoopy that situational, or medical issues can lead to some paranoia. (especially when one has been in an accident, or
victim of some crime or abuse). I don't think transference is a type of projection. I think it is tranferring feelings you had for another onto a new person. I know they seem similar...so I looked up this difference and found this:
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_tr...and_projection
The difference is in the actual expression of the behavior. Projection is getting rid of undesirable thoughts/beliefs that you cannot accept in yourself, and putting them other people.

I was referring to personality styles mostly. I've read and learned a great deal about paranoia, since my mother had this feature. And I have known some other people like this, since I worked with the public for 40+ yrs. Projection... is a major style for these types. They will call YOU a liar, when they themselves are one, etc. The classic "out to get you" ideation is less until real psychosis sets in like it did for my mother. I have found that paranoid projection often is linked to narcissistic traits (preoccupation with the self). I think paranoid personalities are the most difficult to deal with in families and the work place and the public.

Certainly severe stress, (sometimes drugs) can set off this primitive symptom. Being highly vigilant is something we have inherited from our evolution. I have to say, when thinking of paranoia, I think of bunny rabbits... every other animal eats them! They have to be the most vigilant mammal we have!
Vigilance is a mild form of paranoia. And I have to say, I am alarmed when I see so much media/TV/movie plots revolving around "people out to get other people". I have had to stop watching much of TV because of this trend.

I have also met some people who engage in folie a deux...which is a specific type of interaction of two people, that involves a form of projection onto the weaker person to engage in behaviors they would not normally consider.

I especially like Dr. Oldham's personality styles/profile.
He has a great book out with all the styles described in it.
Vigilant personality is the precursor for the Paranoid style.
http://www.hermitary.com/solitude/personality.html
this is a bit of explanation of his work.

The book he has written is really an eye opener! It is paperback and very affordable and written for the layman to understand themselves and those around them.
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Unread 11-10-2009, 01:26 PM   #7
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In reply to Snoopy:

It nips the border of what I am talking about. I definitely see the relationship in the his terming of "transference" in relation to past emotions to present situations based upon reactions to situations that are triggered by past experiences. Yes this does create a kind of emotional time warp/blur of the past and certainly an obscurity of the present situation. What I am inferring is that whether or not a transfer of these "emotional blurs" transfer to those around you or is it a dilution that is seen when in an emotional blur?
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Unread 11-10-2009, 06:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seeker83 View Post
What I am inferring is that whether or not a transfer of these "emotional blurs" transfer to those around you or is it a dilution that is seen when in an emotional blur?
Yes, you can transfer emotions and thoughts to those around you and you can do it wthout realizing you are doing it. A person might take the brunt of your emotions, feelings and thoughts without that person doing anything wrong. These thoughts or emotions have been triggered by "something" and the present is confused by the past. Survival and self-protection takes over.

It can be diluted or more intense. It depends on what the trigger is/was.
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Unread 11-11-2009, 01:37 AM   #9
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Default projection and the other

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoopy View Post
Yes, you can transfer emotions and thoughts to those around you and you can do it without realizing you are doing it. A person might take the brunt of your emotions, feelings and thoughts without that person doing anything wrong. These thoughts or emotions have been triggered by "something" and the present is confused by the past. Survival and self-protection takes over.

It can be diluted or more intense. It depends on what the trigger is/was.
Hi, interesting discussion. I have known of a commonly understood 'phenomenon' whereby the Borderline personality disorder client/friend might unconsciously create in the Other, the emotion they are most afraid of in themselves. Shame for example. This would be felt profoundly by the Other, , who will then act it out or express it with great relief for the Borderline. The Other, (or friend) who is able to recognize the indirect message, does not in fact have any originating feeling state in themselves. Instead taking care to check in with the client, who has no other means to express these intense feelings or own them consciously.

In Essence, transference informs the Other of what is happening in the client (or friend). Too often this ability to discern the origins of strong emotions is compromised and the Other fails to express or name the feeling for the client/friend, by misidentifying it as their own. This can be quite confusing for both, and happen in a flash. Usually due to finding some hook on which to justify the mistaken origins of the emotion, which reside in everyone at some time in their life.

The Borderline type will then act out the severe judgmentalism they fear is originating outside from the Other, believing it is directed toward them with no ability to discern it is their own emotional content being momentarily owned by the Other.

The opportunity to present the shame as an empathetically informed question or checking in by using self-reflection to help the client/friend re-own the emotion, resolves the tension dramatically for both. If at any time empathy by the Other is lost, the Borderline type tends to become enraged, indignant and justifies attacking the other until eventually the shame indeed becomes a real factor for the Other. The strength to withstand this process repeatedly without ever reacting or losing empathy, and continuous vigilance, is often why therapists tend to become burned out with this type of client(or friend). Simply too much effort and time feeling and discerning for the sake of the client/friend who is incapable discernment and self-reflection of their own emotional storms.

This is of course only a generalization of a pattern, yet I think it describes what this discussion question might look like in practicality. I am interested to read if this does illuminate the original question or not. Best Tinglytoes
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Unread 11-11-2009, 10:06 AM   #10
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Not everyone that does transference/projecting has a personality disorder.

Example:

If the person is narcissistic - in their world everything about their life and the choices they make are the fault of someone else. They never take responsibility and they blame others.

If the narcissistic person has a child then that child can be the one blamed for any bad/wrong choices the parent made.

That same child can grow up with very conflicting and confusing signals from the parent(s).

The child grows into an adult and does not have a personality disorder. What that person does have is all of the fear, anger, distrust, hurt and sadness that was part of childhood.

What can possibly happen is that child who is now an adult deals with those feelings, sometimes not knowing why and trying to find the reason. That person doesn't connect what they are feeling to "old feelings" of the past but instead looks at current relationships or situations....transference. Unless the person has an understanding of what is happening nothing will change and transference will continue to happen.
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