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SCS for pain in feet due to neuropathy

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Unread 11-11-2010, 05:07 PM   #1
doghot
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Default SCS for pain in feet due to neuropathy

Hello all you SCS posters. I am new to this site but I love what I've seen as I looked around. I'm hoping that there is someone out there that has had an SCS installed for neuropathy in the feet. I have the usual pain, burning and numbness that goes with having this awful affliction. I get confused when I read the posts that describe the time element; many seem to be taking months to get to the point where their implant is put in place. I simply saw my pain doctor and the SCS was the first thing that he wanted to talk about since I had already done the drug therapy with little success. That was two weeks ago and I'm getting my trial SCS this coming Monday (11-15) (I saw the psycologist last week). I'm reading about hospital stays and painful surgery and he is telling me that the implant (if my temp. shows good results) is a simple outpatient procedure. Could anyone tell me if I'm getting straight scoop from my doctor or am I misreading what some are saying? I would love to hear from some of you. Thanks in advance. - Lonnie
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Unread 11-11-2010, 05:35 PM   #2
Rrae
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Laugh Well HOTdog, Doghot!! :)

I was hoping you'd start a thread of your own!

If you are getting the procedure I got, yes, it is pretty simple cut and dry (no pun intended )
Yes, I was in and out within 3 hours. My Dr did a dual lead percutaneous lumbar implant.....key word >>> percutaneous, meaning the leads were simply placed under the skin via fluoroscopy (like an x-ray). The leads are anchored into the fascia (meaty part) of the dorsal column.

I'm assuming your electrode leads will be placed down low in your spine to get coverage in your feet. ?
The SCS has very good success rates for neuropathic burning pain.

The only drawback to the simple percutaneous lead placement is, it has a much higher risk of lead migration, so we have to be pretty careful not to do anything that would tear the leads from the anchors.

The stories you are reading that talk in terms of hospital stays are the ones that are getting their SCS units implanted via 'Laminectomy' lead placement.
This requires a neurosurgeon to do this. A small piece of bone is removed from the spine to insert the paddle leads.

It sounds like your doctor is confident in your health assessment and moving right along with this.
SCS used to be considered one of the last in line in terms of treatment options, but as of late, these units are becomming rather common place.
Some physicians are actually being a bit too pushy with this option because of the huge financial kickback they recieve.....This leaves the patient feeling very skeptical about what's going on.

Do you feel as though you are being pushed into this a bit too quickly, or are you comfortable with what your doctor is wanting to do. ?
If you have a good relationship with your Dr AND you are familiar with the representatives from the company your SCS is manufactured under, then this is all the better

Your trial on Monday will tell you aLOT!! I'm excited for you!
You will no doubt be in a bit of pain from the procedure for a day or two, so try to realize that for what it is (needle in the back and small incision)....
Mainly just do your best to focus on whether or not you are getting stimulation down to your feet and whether or not it covers over that horrible burning pain.....

Looking forward to hearing how you come along!
It's so good to have you!

Rae
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Unread 11-12-2010, 01:52 PM   #3
doghot
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Default Thanks Rae..................

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rrae View Post
I was hoping you'd start a thread of your own!

If you are getting the procedure I got, yes, it is pretty simple cut and dry (no pun intended )
Yes, I was in and out within 3 hours. My Dr did a dual lead percutaneous lumbar implant.....key word >>> percutaneous, meaning the leads were simply placed under the skin via fluoroscopy (like an x-ray). The leads are anchored into the fascia (meaty part) of the dorsal column.

I'm assuming your electrode leads will be placed down low in your spine to get coverage in your feet. ?
The SCS has very good success rates for neuropathic burning pain.

The only drawback to the simple percutaneous lead placement is, it has a much higher risk of lead migration, so we have to be pretty careful not to do anything that would tear the leads from the anchors.

The stories you are reading that talk in terms of hospital stays are the ones that are getting their SCS units implanted via 'Laminectomy' lead placement.
This requires a neurosurgeon to do this. A small piece of bone is removed from the spine to insert the paddle leads.

It sounds like your doctor is confident in your health assessment and moving right along with this.
SCS used to be considered one of the last in line in terms of treatment options, but as of late, these units are becomming rather common place.
Some physicians are actually being a bit too pushy with this option because of the huge financial kickback they recieve.....This leaves the patient feeling very skeptical about what's going on.

Do you feel as though you are being pushed into this a bit too quickly, or are you comfortable with what your doctor is wanting to do. ?
If you have a good relationship with your Dr AND you are familiar with the representatives from the company your SCS is manufactured under, then this is all the better

Your trial on Monday will tell you aLOT!! I'm excited for you!
You will no doubt be in a bit of pain from the procedure for a day or two, so try to realize that for what it is (needle in the back and small incision)....
Mainly just do your best to focus on whether or not you are getting stimulation down to your feet and whether or not it covers over that horrible burning pain.....

Looking forward to hearing how you come along!
It's so good to have you!

Rae
It was sooo good of you to inlighten me on what to expect. I think I now know enough to proceed comfortably with this SCS. I wasn't thinking though about the possible kickback to the doctor. That would seem to possibly apply here. On the other hand the procedure seems to be somewhat minor for just the trial so after that, and I get positive results, I will be a little more causious about the permanite implant. I'll let you know how it goes and thanks millions. - Lonnie
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Unread 11-12-2010, 02:11 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doghot View Post
Hello all you SCS posters. I am new to this site but I love what I've seen as I looked around. I'm hoping that there is someone out there that has had an SCS installed for neuropathy in the feet. I have the usual pain, burning and numbness that goes with having this awful affliction. I get confused when I read the posts that describe the time element; many seem to be taking months to get to the point where their implant is put in place. I simply saw my pain doctor and the SCS was the first thing that he wanted to talk about since I had already done the drug therapy with little success. That was two weeks ago and I'm getting my trial SCS this coming Monday (11-15) (I saw the psycologist last week). I'm reading about hospital stays and painful surgery and he is telling me that the implant (if my temp. shows good results) is a simple outpatient procedure. Could anyone tell me if I'm getting straight scoop from my doctor or am I misreading what some are saying? I would love to hear from some of you. Thanks in advance. - Lonnie

Hi Hotdog....good to see you here. Sorry to hear that you have this awful pain and burning. But this is a great place to find out all you need to know.

As Rae said there are different types etc. I had the leads put in. I like in Ireland and when I had mine done in August 2010 I was in hospital for 3 nights. It was somewhat painful afterwards, around the incision sites, which is natural, but after a couple of weeks it disappeared. I have lower back pain plus neuropathic pain down my legs into my feet. It helps with the burning and the stabbing pain. I do hope that you get relief too. Make sure you read plenty of the fantastic threads that are on here. You will have a wealth of information
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Unread 11-12-2010, 08:09 PM   #5
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Default Let us know how you are feeling.....

Doghot,....I hope you get on here after you come home with the trial implant in place so you can let us know how you are feeling and any questions you may have. When you first get home from the hospital you'll want to probably just take it easy and lay on ice....but you'll have a TON of tape all over your back to keep everything secured.
But if you get a 3 day trial, try to do things around your house and be active, so that you'll be able to tell if the unit is going to benefit you and allow you to do the things that the pain is keeping you from doing.
If your Dr advises anything otherwise, then by all means don't take MY word....I'm just sharing the average trial expectations......

Your Dr is the top dawg, so do whatever HE instructs. Don't let anything we say go against what your healthcare team says to you. They know your medical history and you may have circumstances which vary from what we've encountered.

HEY JACKIE! Wanted to ask you if your stimulation reaches down to your feet? I didn't realize you had neuropathy in your feet. I knew about the legs, because you and I are very similar in our pain issues......but doghot would be looking to get relief directly to his feet.

I have high hopes for you Lonnie!

Rae
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Unread 11-13-2010, 11:08 AM   #6
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Hope you get on ok Lonnie. I didnt know it could be done so quickly either (once agreed on).

Nurse told me I could be in on the Wednesday and have the trial leads put in .. spend Thursday faffing about getting the stimulation right, then Friday having the permanents put in and going home a few days later.

She also said that they might do the trial then snip off the leads and send me home if the anaesthatist isnt available right away ... and tie things up when he is.
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Unread 11-13-2010, 05:14 PM   #7
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My pain is concentrated in my feet, and during my trial I got 99-100% pain relief from the neuropathy in my feet. It was amazing.

I just had the paddles put in on Wednesday... the simulator hasn't been turned on yet.. it will be on Wednesday when I see the rep. But if things work the way the trial did, I am expecting similar results.

Hope your trial goes well! This still boggles my mind how something like this could give me so much relief from pain! How wonderful.
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My name is Sarah and I am 25 years old. I have a lot of chronic health problems. Peripheral neuropathy and POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) keep me bedridden the majority of the time. I also struggle with degenerative disc disease, disc desiccation, spondylolisthesis, arthritis, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) with insulin resistance, allergies, sound sensitivities, and other health problems.
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Unread 11-13-2010, 06:12 PM   #8
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Rae I do have pain n burning in my feet at times especially when I'm
Sitting/lying down. The stim is right down in my feet which at times I find very uncomfortable especially when I walk. Otherwise it helps!
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Unread 11-13-2010, 07:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smae View Post
My pain is concentrated in my feet, and during my trial I got 99-100% pain relief from the neuropathy in my feet. It was amazing.

I just had the paddles put in on Wednesday... the simulator hasn't been turned on yet.. it will be on Wednesday when I see the rep. But if things work the way the trial did, I am expecting similar results.

Hope your trial goes well! This still boggles my mind how something like this could give me so much relief from pain! How wonderful.
Thank you so much Smae. How encouraging your comments are. To hear from someone with exactly the same problem as myself and with the results that you got with the trial I am really looking forward to Monday. Just hope I have similar results. It sounds like there is a week delay between the trial and the implant. I am really looking forward to hearing how it is going with that. I'll be watching and thanks. - Lonnie (I've never made so many friends so quickly)
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Unread 11-14-2010, 01:10 PM   #10
Rrae
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Default Wishing you the best!

Hey Lonnie!
Just wanted to send my well-wishes for your appointment tomorrow.
We'll be anxious to hear the outcome!

I noticed a new member joined NT today, a graduate from Cornell University who is wanting to be in touch with people who suffer from PN in the feet....
here is the post:
http://neurotalk.psychcentral.com/post715850-1.html

Hope to hear from you soon!
Rae
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