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Cervical rib tos and yoga?

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Unread 02-09-2011, 10:34 PM   #1
Concoulor3
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Default Cervical rib tos and yoga?

I have cervical ribs, my left being large enough that it is attaching to the first rib. About 5 years ago, I finally went to find out why I had numbness, shoulder pain etc... And wallah, found my answer. Carpel tunnel, tos, etc,. Living in CO I visited with Sanders, and let's just say I am glad he retired, he seemed a bit like a chop-doc and only promising a 50/50 chance of any success. Also telling me I will have some deformity in my shoulders! Is that true after rib removal?

So for the past 5 years, I have managed my symptoms with yoga and the occasional massage when I had flair-ups. Last week I was rear ended and I am experiencing far worst symptoms than ever before, however, I feel very blessed, because for the size of my c7 rib, I don't seem to have nearly the same degree of symptoms that I am reading on this forum. I feel yoga has been a strong reason behind this (keep in mind, I do power and bikram)

Question: has anyone else sought yoga for release? With my newest development (rearender) I might be considering surgery. I can't go without yoga (now a form of income) how long would I be unable to do yoga or other forms of exercise post surgery? Has anyone used yoga as a form of rehab?

Sounds like brantigan is the man about tone, guess I shall pay him a visit, guess it's a blessing I live in CO.

Any input would be valued. Thanks
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Unread 02-09-2011, 11:11 PM   #2
Jo*mar
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I suppose if it is a very large and noticeable cervie rib , when removed it might leave a depression in the area.

I think overall the success rate is higher for cervical ribs as well as vascular issues. But it's best to weight all pros and cons before jumping into any surgery.
Nobody wants to be on the poor results side of it - but it happens.

Sometimes it is a persons own body that produces excess scar tissue and even though the surgery went very well and recovery was great- in a year or so symptoms start to return...scar tissue? or a return of TOS?, either way it's not fun...

But it's just hard to tell really how the % good/bad surgery outcomes go, because very few with positive long term recovery and wellness come to forums like this and post about it.

We usually only read about the not so good outcomes...


As for the yoga - I'm sure the basic fitness aspects as well as posture work are big positives.

One poster from a few yrs ago did have a yoga injury that exacerbated her TOS, so just be aware & careful of some posses.
And I don't recall how she actually got hurt during yoga if it was a fall or a pose done wrong...
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Unread 02-13-2011, 11:49 AM   #3
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i love yoga. i would think as long as you are careful you can get back into it. maybe you could teach others who have medical limitations. for me modifications to yoga are required. sometimes the teacher doesn't get that. i once had one who said he would rather be doing pilates. i did not get anything out of it.

a friend has a relative in england who uses yoga in his physical therapy practice. done right it is the wave of the future. i send you only encouragement.
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Unread 02-13-2011, 05:20 PM   #4
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I tried yoga after an MVA figuring the problems were here to stay so I needed to learn to live with it as the doctors didn't know what was up with my arm/shoulder/neck zone. I tried yoga and pilates during the early weeks while I was going through the process of being evaluated for TOS. Bingo, I was positive for TOS. I couldn't handle yoga or pilates and later physical therapy. Similar to you, I was predisposed to TOS with a large bone growth on the first rib but the MVA set off the TOS and it only continued to worsen. I opted for surgery 21 months after the MVA when the muscles in my hand and forearm had wasted away, and pain was never ending. I had to try something. The surgery was 7 years ago and worth it (so far).

I do have a cervical rib on the other side which is becoming symptomatic but waiting for the symptoms to worsen enough to warrant surgery. Because you have anatomical reasons for developing TOS, you may fair better with surgery than most people but it's not guaranteed.
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Unread 02-13-2011, 07:29 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Sheri_TOS View Post
I tried yoga after an MVA figuring the problems were here to stay so I needed to learn to live with it as the doctors didn't know what was up with my arm/shoulder/neck zone. I tried yoga and pilates during the early weeks while I was going through the process of being evaluated for TOS. Bingo, I was positive for TOS. I couldn't handle yoga or pilates and later physical therapy. Similar to you, I was predisposed to TOS with a large bone growth on the first rib but the MVA set off the TOS and it only continued to worsen. I opted for surgery 21 months after the MVA when the muscles in my hand and forearm had wasted away, and pain was never ending. I had to try something. The surgery was 7 years ago and worth it (so far).

I do have a cervical rib on the other side which is becoming symptomatic but waiting for the symptoms to worsen enough to warrant surgery. Because you have anatomical reasons for developing TOS, you may fair better with surgery than most people but it's not guaranteed.
i am having surgery, 1st rib removal, in 2 weeks. i am scared. but i'm on methadone, tramadol, and dilaudid, so it's now necessary. i've been dealing with it since 2005. i'm really scared. i have to have a pain pharamasist, because my surgeon said he cannot give me meds since mine are so high already, and that "we will have a hard time controlling your pain afterward." he said i will be back to work in 4 weeks, and we will see if we need to do the right side as well. i'm 99% sure we are going to do the right side. i would rather he do it right away instead of me going back to work for a couple months and then off again.
can you tell me your experience after surgery? i type all day and sit at a desk. i like to garden, walk my dog, i want to have a baby, and i want to stop picking fights with my loving boyfriend because i'm taking my anxiety out on him.
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Unread 02-14-2011, 01:37 PM   #6
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Thanks so much for the input. I meet with Dr. Brantigan next week. I will update you on what he finds. I think it is such a bummer that so many meds are needed to manage this, Tannemich. Just imagining a surgery (and I don't even know if that's going to be the recommendation) scares me. But, many seem to have benefitted and it seems to me that you are not having much of a life right now, even half-over improvement from surgery sounds better than what you are going through. Try not to have your ailment define who you are.

I have come to realize that I think too many persons overlook yoga as a therapy, esp since it doesn't come with a 4 year degree. And I understand, there are many yoga instructors who are not qualified to give "therapy". I actually have a degree in Kinesiology, so I have a deep understanding on how the body functions. I hope that will aide me in recovery, if surgery is determined to be my best option. But, yes, I am already looking into yoga rehab. Since I live close to Denver and this seems to be a mini TOS-Mecca, might be a good start??? Sometimes wished I had gone on to get my PT license, but collaboration works well, too.

Can anyone explain why re-growth happens? I will ask Dr. B. that question as well, curious...

Thanks all! Yoga shall always be in my life, I might just have to adjust.
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