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Eating only every other day might save you

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Unread 10-01-2006, 04:36 PM   #1
reverett123
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Default Eating only every other day might save you

Intermittent fasting is simply eating every other day. The good news is that you can eat as much as you like on that day. In light of the thread on blood sugar, this might be the single smartest move open to us. I just added this to the "Therapies Now" sticky as well.

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1: J Neurochem. 2003 Feb;84(3):417-31. Links
Meal size and frequency affect neuronal plasticity and vulnerability to disease: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

* Mattson MP,
* Duan W,
* Guo Z.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA.

Although all cells in the body require energy to survive and function properly, excessive calorie intake over long time periods can compromise cell function and promote disorders such as cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and cancers. Accordingly, dietary restriction (DR; either caloric restriction or intermittent fasting, with maintained vitamin and mineral intake) can extend lifespan and can increase disease resistance. Recent studies have shown that DR can have profound effects on brain function and vulnerability to injury and disease. DR can protect neurons against degeneration in animal models of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases and stroke. Moreover, DR can stimulate the production of new neurons from stem cells (neurogenesis) and can enhance synaptic plasticity, which may increase the ability of the brain to resist aging and restore function following injury. Interestingly, increasing the time interval between meals can have beneficial effects on the brain and overall health of mice that are independent of cumulative calorie intake. The beneficial effects of DR, particularly those of intermittent fasting, appear to be the result of a cellular stress response that stimulates the production of proteins that enhance neuronal plasticity and resistance to oxidative and metabolic insults; they include neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), protein chaperones such as heat-shock proteins, and mitochondrial uncoupling proteins. Some beneficial effects of DR can be achieved by administering hormones that suppress appetite (leptin and ciliary neurotrophic factor) or by supplementing the diet with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, which may act as a calorie restriction mimetic. The profound influences of the quantity and timing of food intake on neuronal function and vulnerability to disease have revealed novel molecular and cellular mechanisms whereby diet affects the nervous system, and are leading to novel preventative and therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

PMID: 12558961 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1: Ageing Res Rev. 2006 Aug;5(3):332-53. Epub 2006 Aug 8.Click here to read Links
Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting: Two potential diets for successful brain aging.

* Martin B,
* Mattson MP,
* Maudsley S.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, United States.

The vulnerability of the nervous system to advancing age is all too often manifest in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review article we describe evidence suggesting that two dietary interventions, caloric restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF), can prolong the health-span of the nervous system by impinging upon fundamental metabolic and cellular signaling pathways that regulate life-span. CR and IF affect energy and oxygen radical metabolism, and cellular stress response systems, in ways that protect neurons against genetic and environmental factors to which they would otherwise succumb during aging. There are multiple interactive pathways and molecular mechanisms by which CR and IF benefit neurons including those involving insulin-like signaling, FoxO transcription factors, sirtuins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. These pathways stimulate the production of protein chaperones, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes, all of which help cells cope with stress and resist disease. A better understanding of the impact of CR and IF on the aging nervous system will likely lead to novel approaches for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders.

PMID: 16899414 [PubMed - in process]

1: Physiol Rev. 2002 Jul;82(3):637-72.Click here to read Links
Modification of brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders by genes, diet, and behavior.

* Mattson MP,
* Chan SL,
* Duan W.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. mattsonm@grc.nia.nih.gov

Multiple molecular, cellular, structural, and functional changes occur in the brain during aging. Neural cells may respond to these changes adaptively, or they may succumb to neurodegenerative cascades that result in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Multiple mechanisms are employed to maintain the integrity of nerve cell circuits and to facilitate responses to environmental demands and promote recovery of function after injury. The mechanisms include production of neurotrophic factors and cytokines, expression of various cell survival-promoting proteins (e.g., protein chaperones, antioxidant enzymes, Bcl-2 and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins), preservation of genomic integrity by telomerase and DNA repair proteins, and mobilization of neural stem cells to replace damaged neurons and glia. The aging process challenges such neuroprotective and neurorestorative mechanisms. Genetic and environmental factors superimposed upon the aging process can determine whether brain aging is successful or unsuccessful. Mutations in genes that cause inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease (amyloid precursor protein and presenilins), Parkinson's disease (alpha-synuclein and Parkin), and trinucleotide repeat disorders (huntingtin, androgen receptor, ataxin, and others) overwhelm endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms; other genes, such as those encoding apolipoprotein E(4), have more subtle effects on brain aging. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms can be bolstered by dietary (caloric restriction and folate and antioxidant supplementation) and behavioral (intellectual and physical activities) modifications. At the cellular and molecular levels, successful brain aging can be facilitated by activating a hormesis response in which neurons increase production of neurotrophic factors and stress proteins. Neural stem cells that reside in the adult brain are also responsive to environmental demands and appear capable of replacing lost or dysfunctional neurons and glial cells, perhaps even in the aging brain. The recent application of modern methods of molecular and cellular biology to the problem of brain aging is revealing a remarkable capacity within brain cells for adaptation to aging and resistance to disease.

PMID: 12087131 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1: J Nutr Biochem. 2005 Mar;16(3):129-37.Click here to read Links
Beneficial effects of intermittent fasting and caloric restriction on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems.

* Mattson MP,
* Wan R.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. mattsonm@grc.nia.nih.gov

Intermittent fasting (IF; reduced meal frequency) and caloric restriction (CR) extend lifespan and increase resistance to age-related diseases in rodents and monkeys and improve the health of overweight humans. Both IF and CR enhance cardiovascular and brain functions and improve several risk factors for coronary artery disease and stroke including a reduction in blood pressure and increased insulin sensitivity. Cardiovascular stress adaptation is improved and heart rate variability is increased in rodents maintained on an IF or a CR diet. Moreover, rodents maintained on an IF regimen exhibit increased resistance of heart and brain cells to ischemic injury in experimental models of myocardial infarction and stroke. The beneficial effects of IF and CR result from at least two mechanisms--reduced oxidative damage and increased cellular stress resistance. Recent findings suggest that some of the beneficial effects of IF on both the cardiovascular system and the brain are mediated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in the brain. Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects of IF and CR on the cardiovascular system and the brain are similar to those of regular physical exercise, suggesting shared mechanisms. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which IF and CR affect the blood vessels and heart and brain cells will likely lead to novel preventative and therapeutic strategies for extending health span.

PMID: 15741046 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1: Annu Rev Nutr. 2005;25:237-60.Click here to read Links
Energy intake, meal frequency, and health: a neurobiological perspective.

* Mattson MP.

Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, and Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. mattsonm@grc.nia.nih.gov

The size and frequency of meals are fundamental aspects of nutrition that can have profound effects on the health and longevity of laboratory animals. In humans, excessive energy intake is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers and is a major cause of disability and death in industrialized countries. On the other hand, the influence of meal frequency on human health and longevity is unclear. Both caloric (energy) restriction (CR) and reduced meal frequency/intermittent fasting can suppress the development of various diseases and can increase life span in rodents by mechanisms involving reduced oxidative damage and increased stress resistance. Many of the beneficial effects of CR and fasting appear to be mediated by the nervous system. For example, intermittent fasting results in increased production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which increases the resistance of neurons in the brain to dysfunction and degeneration in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders; BDNF signaling may also mediate beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which meal size and frequency affect human health may lead to novel approaches for disease prevention and treatment.

PMID: 16011467 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



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Born in 1953, 1st symptoms and misdiagnosed as essential tremor in 1992. Dx with PD in 2000.
Currently (2011) taking 200/50 Sinemet CR 8 times a day + 10/100 Sinemet 3 times a day. Functional 90% of waking day but fragile. Failure at exercise but still trying. Constantly experimenting. Beta blocker and ACE inhibitor at present. Currently (01/2013) taking ldopa/carbadopa 200/50 CR six times a day + 10/100 form 3 times daily. Functional 90% of day. Update 04/2013: L/C 200/50 8x; Beta Blocker; ACE Inhib; Ginger; Turmeric; Creatine; Magnesium; Potassium. Doing well.
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Unread 10-01-2006, 05:54 PM   #2
rosebud
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Default Can we stick to one program at a time!

Your wearing us all out! You must be great fun to live with. Fasting is good -but like all things "In moderation". Your going to kill yourself off before PD ever gets you! Love ya anyway.... but take a breath would ya!
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Unread 10-01-2006, 07:28 PM   #3
reverett123
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Default Gawd, you don't think I'm doing all this, do you????

I'm just passing it on and helping to "populate" the new forum. If I paid full attention to myself my darned head would explode!!

But I must admit the fasting thing appeals. It puts the power in our hands and has a lot of research behind it.
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Born in 1953, 1st symptoms and misdiagnosed as essential tremor in 1992. Dx with PD in 2000.
Currently (2011) taking 200/50 Sinemet CR 8 times a day + 10/100 Sinemet 3 times a day. Functional 90% of waking day but fragile. Failure at exercise but still trying. Constantly experimenting. Beta blocker and ACE inhibitor at present. Currently (01/2013) taking ldopa/carbadopa 200/50 CR six times a day + 10/100 form 3 times daily. Functional 90% of day. Update 04/2013: L/C 200/50 8x; Beta Blocker; ACE Inhib; Ginger; Turmeric; Creatine; Magnesium; Potassium. Doing well.
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Unread 10-01-2006, 09:50 PM   #4
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Default appealing

I don't know why, but this just seems to make sense to me - and is something that I can accomplish. It's easier for me to NOT do something than for me to DO something! Oh, that PD apathy!!!
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Unread 10-06-2006, 04:38 PM   #5
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Default

An old thread about fasting:

http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:...s&ct=clnk&cd=4

"Both caloric (energy) restriction (CR) and reduced meal frequency/intermittent fasting can suppress the development of various diseases and can increase life span in rodents by mechanisms involving reduced oxidative damage and increased stress resistance.

Many of the beneficial effects of CR and fasting appear to be mediated by the nervous system.

For example, intermittent fasting results in increased production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which increases the resistance of neurons in the brain to dysfunction and degeneration in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders;

BDNF signaling may also mediate beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which meal size and frequency affect human health may lead to novel approaches for disease prevention and treatment."
********************************
Neurology 2003;60:690-695
© 2003 American Academy of Neurology
Medical Hypothesis
Will caloric restriction and folate protect against AD and PD?
Mark P. Mattson, PhD

From the Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, MD.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Mark P. Mattson, Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center 4F01, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224; e-mail: mattsonm@grc.nia.nih.gov

Recent epidemiologic studies of different sample populations have suggested that the risk of AD and PD may be increased in individuals with high-calorie diets and in those with increased homocysteine levels. Dietary restriction and supplementation with folic acid can reduce neuronal damage and improve behavioral outcome in mouse models of AD and PD.

Animal studies have shown that the beneficial effects of dietary restriction result, in part, from increased production of neurotrophic factors and cytoprotective protein chaperones in neurons. By keeping homocysteine levels low, folic acid can protect cerebral vessels and can prevent the accumulation of DNA damage in neurons caused by oxidative stress and facilitated by homocysteine. Although further studies are required in humans, the emerging data suggest that high-calorie diets and elevated homocysteine levels may render the brain vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders.

http://neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/60/4/690

MORE OF THAT THREAD IS HERE:

http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:...s&ct=clnk&cd=8
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Last edited by ZucchiniFlower; 10-06-2006 at 04:43 PM.
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Unread 04-16-2009, 10:00 PM   #6
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Default metabolism

i am 17 almost 18 and i was thinking about trying this.
how does it affect your matabolism, because i know if you skip breakfast your metabalism slows down. i am very skinny and i wann keep a high metabolism threw my later years. thanks
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Unread 04-17-2009, 12:52 AM   #7
lou_lou
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Arrow fasting is dangerous for some -

if you are a hypoglycemic, you should not fast, you may wish to eat smaller
portions -
yet if you do not have enough glucose -you can go into a low blood sugar induced coma, similiar to diabetic's
http://www.healthexpertadvice.org/he...ycemia-288.htm
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Unread 04-17-2009, 03:09 AM   #8
reverett123
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Default Wait a minute

You don't mention PD and I hope you are not "blessed" with it at your age, but one thing that leaps to mind is that you are at a stage where you still need a lot of food and high quality at that. You still have another five years or so of things growing, especially in your nervous system.

Don't think of limiting yourself so much as thinking in terms of maximizing the quality of what you eat. You are laying a foundation that will support you the rest of your life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by domscurious View Post
i am 17 almost 18 and i was thinking about trying this.
how does it affect your matabolism, because i know if you skip breakfast your metabalism slows down. i am very skinny and i wann keep a high metabolism threw my later years. thanks
__________________
Born in 1953, 1st symptoms and misdiagnosed as essential tremor in 1992. Dx with PD in 2000.
Currently (2011) taking 200/50 Sinemet CR 8 times a day + 10/100 Sinemet 3 times a day. Functional 90% of waking day but fragile. Failure at exercise but still trying. Constantly experimenting. Beta blocker and ACE inhibitor at present. Currently (01/2013) taking ldopa/carbadopa 200/50 CR six times a day + 10/100 form 3 times daily. Functional 90% of day. Update 04/2013: L/C 200/50 8x; Beta Blocker; ACE Inhib; Ginger; Turmeric; Creatine; Magnesium; Potassium. Doing well.
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