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my foot is freezing AND burning!

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Unread 04-03-2008, 02:20 PM   #1
Erin524
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Default my foot is freezing AND burning!

Does anyone know what to do to make a "freezing" and "burning" foot to stop feeling weird. The freezing and burning is (I think) neurological in origin. It must have something to do with my foot being numb for most of the past week or two.

This morning, it's back to being more numb, but not as bad as it was the other day, but it's freezing and burning at the same time. Like a hot and cold tingly sensation. I dont have any meds for something like this. I'd try the amitriptyline that my regular doctor gave me. (he claimed it helps with nerve pain) but it's too early in the day to take something that's going to be making me sleepy. (plus, I just took one of my migraine pills, and I dont want to mix that with an amitriptyline)

Anyone know what might make it feel better? Suggestions?
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Unread 04-03-2008, 03:01 PM   #2
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here, Erin, I hope this helps.

it's the best description I could find for why certain anti-depressants are used for the "freezing/burning" thing.

Nortriptyline worked for me.... good luck honey!

Central neuropathic pain is well recognized in MS and occurs in about 30% of people with MS. It is believed to be the direct result of demylination of the sensory pathways of pain and temperature. However, it is unlikely that a single sensory pathway is totally responsible. It is suspected there are multiple sensory pain pathways involved, but the exact mechanism is poorly understood.

The description of neuropathic pain varies and is often hard for people to describe. The most common description is a freezing or cold/burning sensation usually of the limbs and most often of the lower extremities.

Treatment

When looking at drugs available to treat neuropathic pain, tricyclic antidepressants are the first choice of treatment. Of these, amitriptyline is most frequently used for its pain reducing and sedating properties. Similar drugs such as nortriptyline or desipramine are used when the side effects of sedation or dryness that can occur with amitriptyline are poorly tolerated.

Tricyclic antidepressants work because they block the normal function of serotonin. It is one of the chemical substances of the nervous system involved in nerve impulse transmission.


http://groups.msn.com/MSPeople/mspain.msnw
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Unread 04-03-2008, 03:18 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CayoKay View Post
here, Erin, I hope this helps.

it's the best description I could find for why certain anti-depressants are used for the "freezing/burning" thing.

Nortriptyline worked for me.... good luck honey!

Central neuropathic pain is well recognized in MS and occurs in about 30% of people with MS. It is believed to be the direct result of demylination of the sensory pathways of pain and temperature. However, it is unlikely that a single sensory pathway is totally responsible. It is suspected there are multiple sensory pain pathways involved, but the exact mechanism is poorly understood.

The description of neuropathic pain varies and is often hard for people to describe. The most common description is a freezing or cold/burning sensation usually of the limbs and most often of the lower extremities.

Treatment

When looking at drugs available to treat neuropathic pain, tricyclic antidepressants are the first choice of treatment. Of these, amitriptyline is most frequently used for its pain reducing and sedating properties. Similar drugs such as nortriptyline or desipramine are used when the side effects of sedation or dryness that can occur with amitriptyline are poorly tolerated.

Tricyclic antidepressants work because they block the normal function of serotonin. It is one of the chemical substances of the nervous system involved in nerve impulse transmission.


http://groups.msn.com/MSPeople/mspain.msnw

So, I should try the amitriptyline later tonight once my migraine pill has worn off? I think I can deal with the freezing cold, burning hot tingly foot till then.
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Unread 04-03-2008, 03:21 PM   #4
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I just read something about capsaicin cream helping this type of symptom...and I just happen to have a tube of that particular type of cream in my bathroom. I think I'll put a little on my ankle where it's tingling and see if that helps, and if it does, I'll use that till it's bedtime tonight.
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Unread 04-03-2008, 03:27 PM   #5
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hey, good idea!

I got desperate once, and used Tiger Balm.

and alternating heat and cold packs.

(meaning, a nuked wet dish towel, and a ziplock baggie full of ice)

my strategy was to bedevil and confuse things so the WRONG messages would get "lost in transit"

but then again, I don't suppose I was thinking that clearly, lol!

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Unread 04-03-2008, 03:36 PM   #6
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oh, and on the nortriptyline...

I seem to remember that it isn't a one-dose kinda deal...

something about having to get blood levels up?

that was ten years ago, so it's kinda foggy in mah poor haid.

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/abo...ine/index.aspx

I do remember I was on the stuff for a year...
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Unread 04-03-2008, 04:51 PM   #7
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I've had the cold/hot tinglies before. About a week or two before I got diagnosed. It was actually considered my 2nd exacerbation and added to the MRI's I got a week after the cold/hot tinglies started, was what got me my diagnosis. (was more likely my 3rd or 4th exacerbation, but the neuro had only seen the exacerbation before it and wouldnt count the others)

At the time it lasted about 2 or 3 weeks (I think) so if it's acting the same as last time, I might (hopefully!) get normal sensation back in a week or two. (knock on wood!)

I just got back from the yarn store, and I think walking around a bit helped some. It's not burning as much...just cold tinglies right now.
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Unread 04-11-2008, 12:26 PM   #8
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hey i hear you about the freezing and burning, I have that in both of my feet and ankles. And i am on gabapentin. But i find that if you put a hot water bottle on it, it kida soothes it but doesnt make it go away
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Unread 04-11-2008, 12:39 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjohnston View Post
hey i hear you about the freezing and burning, I have that in both of my feet and ankles. And i am on gabapentin. But i find that if you put a hot water bottle on it, it kida soothes it but doesnt make it go away
It's going away now. My foot is no longer hot/cold/tingly any more (YAY!!!!)

It built up from the hot/cold/tingly sensation until it was a hot/cold/totally numb sensation, and then it started back into the tinglies, but not hot anymore. It was cold for a few days with numbness, but now it's almost feeling normal. Except for some residual numbness along the edge of my foot and some mild tinglies on the right side of the heel.

I do have a teeny bit of numbness in the "middle" toe that goes to the pinky toe, but most of the numbness is in that "middle" toe.

I'm just happy that it seems like it's starting to remit...so I guess it's true that I'm RRMS. I keep worrying that I have a more progressive form...so I'm happy to see the remitting part of RRMS is true.
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Unread 04-11-2008, 07:27 PM   #10
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Erin
I'm glad to hear your sx are subsiding. I often wonder if I've changed MS categories myself. Then I say, self, whether you did or didn't doesn't matter, it is what it is.

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